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in 2010 with funding from 

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PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE 

STATE- NORMAL -SCHOOL 



>y \'ji:l;ini.* 



FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA J* NINETEEN HUNDRED 



ttfS 



2)eMcation. 



T 



DR. ROBERT FRAZER. our beloved President, 
this volume is dedicated in love and admiration 
for him and in appreciation of his untiring zeal 
in behalf of our School. 




IiIEXDS, ere we sweep aside the veil 
Tliitt liiiles irliiit Ihe future has in store, 
]Ve turn irith a lore that shall not fail 
For a last goodbye to the dai/s of i/ore ; 
We but follow those who are gone before, 
Yet our hearts bent faster, as we rcccdl 
The days and ways that are ours no more 
A long fare u-ell to you, one and all. 



For memories born of ei vain regret 
^^ Shcdl haunt us forever — forever arise 

The sheides of the things ive can never forget. 
The ghosts of our laughter, the ghosts of our sigJis, 
Dream faces, the sadness of tear-dimmed eyes, 
And the footsteps thed echoed along our halls, 
]]'ith swdches of (jld-time melodies — 
^4 long farewell to you, one and (dl. 



So we give you, this book with songs inwrought, 
And smiles and tears- may you read and knoiv 
The things that we did and dre(fmed and thongJd 
In the care-free life of the long ago ; 
And the tides of fancy shcdl backwards flow 
Till the old-time pleasures again enthrall, 
And we live once more in their golden glow. 
But — a long farewell to you, one and cdl. 
5 . 




DR. FRAZER. 



RECENT PROGRESS AT THE NORMAL, 



No OXE denies that our School occupies 
an important position in relation to public 
education, for we often hear that the 
success of Virginia in the future will be greatly 
due to the young women trained here — for the 
past sixteen j-ears, 1 think, the State officials have 
realized this fact. 

Free tuition is now given to all applicants 
promising to teach two yeai'S in the Public 
Schools, the teachers receiving pay for their work. 
Before Dr. Frazer's connection with the School, 
there were two hundred scholarships offered — 
one for each county and city, and one for each 
additional representative. Up to this time there 
were fifty-one counties and cities without repre- 
sentation, but the number has been decreased to 
thirty. This is owing to our President, who has 
spared nothing in trying to make everv village, 
town, city and county come in touch with this 
School, and, through the girls ecpiipped here, 
recognize the value of its work. 

The free tuition to all has enaljled many 
girls to enroll here, and in this way "helped the 
dear old Commonwealth." 

Though the State organized this institution 
for her teachers, yet until last year she did not 
accord recognition to her own work, but required 
Farmville Normal graduates to be examined to 
hold schools just as she did pupils from the 
country public schools. But Dr. Frazer worked 
hard that this should be otherwise, and his effort 
plainly .showed the girls that their President is 
fully alive to their best interests, and that he 
thinks them competent to teach in the Public 
Schools. AVe feel proud of bis success. 

He has also revised the courses of study with 
reference to a clearer defining of their aims and 



requirements, and a more exact adaptation to the 
pi-esent needs of the Public Schools, making the 
Xormal diploma a three years' course, and the 
Scientific and Classic each a four years' course. 
By doing this he procured official recognition of 
the School as related to the public school system 
of the State ; the diploma of the Normal Course 
now being the basis of State license for five years, 
and that of the Full Course, either Classic or 
Scientific, for seven years. To show further his 
interest in education, he organized the Virginia 
Normal League, the plan and object of which are 
stated elsewhere. 

Our President continues to work with the 
friends of this School for its good and advance- 
ment, for quite recently he succeeded iit having 
the following bills passed by the Legislature : 

To' appropriate a sum for the building- of a 
Gymnasium with modern equipments. 

For an Infirmar\-, with hot and cold baths ; 
a Steam Laundry, and a Steam Plant for heating 
all the buildings. 

Dr. Frazer is untiring in his efibrts to keep 
this institution in the ranks of the best Normal 
schools in the country, and to bring about recog- 
nition of its value to the State. 

How we are looking forward to the (iym- 
nasium ! Though we have had main' enjoyable 
exercises in Physical Culture, yet we have been 
cramped for room and apparatus, and now these 
inconveniences being removed, we feel sure the 
exercises will give great pleasure and lasting 
benefit. The' Infirmary, with its hot and cold 
baths, means many comforts unknown to old 
students, as do the Steam Laundry and Steam 
Plant. Eebecca Jane Whealtoh. 




A^A 



OO 



A^A 



SESSION 1899-1900 BEGAN 

Wednet lay, September 20. 

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY, 

Thursday, November 23. 

CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY— ONE DAY, 

Monday, December 25. 

EXAMINATIONS OP FIRST TERM BEGAN 
Monday, January 22. 

DELIVERY OF DIPLOMAS, 

Friday, January 26. 

CLASS EXERCISES, 

Friday, January 26. 
SECOND TERM BEGAN 

Monday, January 29. 
SPRING HOLIDAY— ONE DAY. 



EXAMINATIONS OF SECOND TERM BEGIN 
Monday, May 28. 

CLOSING EXERCISES OF SECOND TERM FROM 

Monday, June 4, to Thursday, June 1 . 











j..^.j..^ PRHFACK '^■■^■■^■■^ 









IN THE SPRING OF 1898 it was detemuned to have an aiuHial of the Xoinial School. 
For the purpose of effecting this end Miss Mary Garnett Jackson, of Farmville, was elected 
editor-in-chief, and Miss Annie Hawes Cunningham, of Farmfille, business manager. 
The next year it was again decided to have an annual, and Miss Ella Godwin, of Fincastle, was 
elected editor-in-chief, and Miss Maud Jones, of Sheppards, business manager. 

In the fall of 1899, at a joint meeting of the Senior classes, it was determined to publish another 
annual, and, if possible, make it even more characteristic of the School than the preceding issues had 
been. It will be noticed that the name Normal Light has been laid aside for The Vjrginian. But 
the old name would never have been displaced for any except for one in which we felt sure that all trne 
Virginians, even the old editors, would glorv. As this is the only school for girls in the State under 
State control, we selected The Virginian as he name most expressive of our loyalty to our State and 
our sense of indebtedness to her. 

All who have ever attended the Normal will know with what ditficulty outside work is accom- 
plished, and, therefore, will be able to appreciate the toil and labor, on the part of the board of editors, 
which this annual represents. So we hope all mistakes will be judged leniently. 

Several new features have been introduced, viz., "Bachelors' Reveries," contributed by friends 
at Hampden-Sidney. A new phase of school life is brought out by this department, and we tliink the 
"old girls" will enjoy the remarks as given from the point of view of the opposite sex. 

Then, each class was allowed to elect an associate editor and also to put in its picture. This 
will make the annual valuable to the girls of the lower classes. 

We desire to thank the following for their aid in contributions, illustrations, etc. : 

Miss M. F. Stone ; Mes. Portia Morrison ; Mrs. Wiley Morris, of Sheppards, Virginia ; 
Miss M. W. Coulling ; Miss Julia G. Tyler, of Williamsburg, '\'irginia ; Mr. W. E. Davis, of 
Knoxville. Tenne.ssee. 




BOARD OF EDITORS. 



^ ^!t^ *;|t *!:* ^Ht tI ? t|* t?? ^1* ^?? *;?? tf ? *?? ^^^^ 'il* t?? *;!* tl^ *!:* '^l* ^?^ ^ 



....Boavb of Ebitors,... 



^ 4^ 4* 4* ^|;i 4* 4^ 4* ^|;i ^I;* 4* 4* 4"^ 4* 4^ 4^ 4* 4* 4* ^1^ 4^ '^ 



ANNA BRUCE HOUSTON, LexixXGton, Vieginia, 
Editor-in-Chief. 

GRACE ESTELLE ELCAN, Sheppakds, Virginia, 
Business jMaiiager. 

ALICE ATKINSON, Willi amsport, Pennsylvania, 
Assistant Business Manager. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

MARY CHANNING COLE]MAN, South Boston, Virginia. 

MAMIE KATHERINE RICHARDSON, West Point, Virginia. 

EDITORS FROM CLASS OF JUNE, 1901. 

REBECCA JANE WHEALTON, CiiiNCOTEAorE, Vircunia. 

JENNIE CARTER MESEROLE JACKSON, Earmville, Va. 

EDITOR FROM CLASS OF FEBRUARY, 1902. 
CLARA HELOISE PERCIFT-LL, Water View, Virginia. 

EDITOR FROM CLASS OF FEBRUARY, 1903. 
ELIZABETH GERTRUDE PIERCE, Berkeley, A'irginia. 



EDITOR FROM CLASS OF JUNE, 1903. 
ANNIE LAURA KINZER, Front Royal, Virginia. 

11 




JSoavb of XTvustecs. 



Hon. KOBERT TL'KNBl"LL, President, Lawrenceville, Va. 

Hon. JOHN J.4CKS0N, Vice-President, Richmond, Va. 

Hon. J. AV. SOUTHALT., Supt. Public Instruction {e.r-nfficio), Richmond, Va. 

Eev. JAMES NELSON, D. D., Richmond, Va. 

Hon. S. S. AVILKINS, Bird's Nest, Va. 

Hon. WILLIAM A. LITTLE, Fredericlcsburg, Va. 

J. S. WARE, Esq., Ben-yville, Va. 

J. P. JEFFRIES, Esq., Warrenton, Ya. 

Judge J. L. TEEDWAY, Chatham, Va. 

Pres. W. L. WILSON, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. 

Hon. O. L. STEARNS, Salem, Xa.. 

Prof. W. A. JENKINS, Portsmouth, Va. 

Judge J. M. CRUTE, Farmville, Va. 

W. W. KENNON, Esq., Powhatan, Va. 

Judge A. D. WATKINS, Secretary and Treasurer, Farmville, Va. 



12 



THE FACULTY, 



MISS VIRGINIA REYNOLDS, of Kittanning, Pennsylvania, who now 
teaches Geography, Physiology and Botany at the State Normal School, 
is a graduate of the Oswego Normal School, New York, and has done summer 
work for four years at Cornell and Harvard. 

Miss Mattie xVlexaniu:r Martin, of Pulaski county, Virginia, who is at 
present Principal of the Practice School and teacher of Senior English and 
Psychology at the State Normal School, was educated in Virginia. Miss Martin 
has studied at the Peabody Normal College and University of Nashville, Nashville, 
Tennessee. Before coming to this School she taught for several years in the Pea- 
body Normal College. 

Miss Edna Virginia Mofkktt, from Richmond, A'irgiuia, is the teaclier 
of History and English Literature at the State Normal School. She graduated 
first at Hollins Institute and afterwards at Vassar College. 

Miss Mary F. Stone was educated in the public and ]irivate scliools of 
Bedford City. For three years she was Principal of the famous Hampton Acad- 
emy, at Hampton, Virginia, and for two, Vice-Principal of the Commerce Street 
School in Roanoke. Since LS!l2 she has taught Literature and Composition at the 
Normal School. Her home is at Roanoke, Virginia. 

Miss Sarah E. Pritchett, of Albemarle county, is a graduate of tiie 
Miller Manual School, and of the State Normal School, Farmviile, Virginia. 
Siie has also taken the Freshman work in English at Harvard University, and 
has completed tlie course in Typewriting and Stenography at Eastman College, 
Poughkeepsie, New Y^ork. Siie is n(3w teacher of Tj'pewriting and Stt'uography 
and assistant teacher in English at the State Normal School. 

Miss S. Gay Patteson, of Manchester, Virginia, has stu(lic<i at lladc'lift'c 
College, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Slie taught in Mount Holyoke College, Soutii 
Hadley, Massachusetts, for four years before. coming to the State Normal School, 
where she is now teacher of Mathematics. 

Miss Lelia Jefferson Harvie, of Amelia county, Virginia, is assistant 

13 




THE FACULTY. 



teacher of Mathematics at tlie State Ndrnial School. INIiss ITarvic graduated at 
the Normal School in 1892, and has since pursued her studies at Cornell Univer- 
sity, New York. 

Miss Lula O. Andrews, of Lafayette, Alabama, who is teacher of Music, 
Physical Culture and History and Science of Education, is a graduate of Pealiody 
Normal College, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Miss Martha Willis Coullixg, who is teacher of Form and Drawing, 
and who is Librarian at the State Normal School, is from Richmond, Virginia. 
She graduated at the Peabody Normal College, Nashville, Tennessee, and has 
studied at the Teachers' College, New York. 

Miss Fannie Talbot Littleton, whose home is in Chester, Virginia, is 
teaclier of Physics and Chemistry at the State Normal School. She is a graduate 
of the Normal School ; has taken the University course in Chemistry at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and has since pursued her studies at Cornell University, New 
York. 

Miss Marguerite Carroi>i>, of St. Louis, Missouri, is a graduate of tiie 
State Normal School at Farm ville, Virginia, and has also taken a course in Chemistry 
at the University of Virginia. She has studied Ciiemistry and Physics at tiie 
Washington University, St. Louis, and is now assistant teacher of IMatlieniatics 
and substitute teacher of Ciiemistry at the State Normal Sciiool. 

Miss Minnie Vaughan Rice, of Farmville, Virginia, who is now teacher 
of Latin at tlie State Normal ScIkio], was a graduate of tlie Farmville College 
when it was under the management of Dr. Paul \\'hitehead. She afterwards took 
a short course at Harvard UniversiJ:y. 

Miss Estelle Smith ey, formerly of Amelia county, holds tlie diploma in 
the schools of French, German and Mathematics from Randolph-Macon College, 
at Ashland, and has completed the English work for the A. B. degree. Slie has 
recently studied in Paris, and has the French diploma of the French Alliance. 
Miss Smithey is now teacher of Modern Languages at the State Normal Sciiool. 

Miss Clara Fitzgerald Spiljian, of Warrenton, Virginia, is Assistant 
Librarian at the State Normal School. Siie has studied Music in Baltimore at the 
Peabody Conservatory, and also in Italy, and has private pupils in Farmville. 



IDomestic department. 



MRS. PORTIA L. MORRISON, 
MISS SARAH P. SPENCER, - 
MISS GENEVIEVE HAYNP^S, 



Head or Home. 

Assistant. 
Housekeeper. 



MR. B. M. COX, -------- Steward. 

DR. PETER WINSTON, ----- Attending Physician. 



9! 








THE ALUMN/E ASSOCIATION 



President, . . . MISS LELIA JEFFERSON HARVIE. 

Vice-President, MISS BELLE WICKER. 

Secretary, . . . MISS MAUDE GRAY. 

Treasurer, . . . MRS. LEWIS CLAIBORNE. 



The Aliimiiie A.^^.soeiation of the State Normal School was organized June 2.'), 
1887. The object of the society is to promote social intercoiu-se between its mem- 
bers and to aid in furthering the interest of the School. Since the time of organ- 
ization meetings have been held regularly every alternate year. At these meetings 
there are two prominent features — the business and the social. For the latter a 
special program is arranged, after the execution of which a banquet is given ; and 
the evening passes pleasantly for all, as the girls mingle once again within the 
doors of Alma Mater. 

The Association is at present specially interested in the Cunningham Memo- 
rial Scholarship Fund. 



CUNNINGHAM MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, 



At the moctiug of the Alumiife Association of the State Female Xiirmal 
Scliool, in June, 1899, it was decicled to found a memorial scholarship to Dr. Joliu 
A. Cunningham. The scholarship will be at the State Female Normal School, 
and will probably be awarded by competitive examinations. This was decided on 
instead of a monument, because it was thought that it \\ould l)e more in harmony 
with Dr. Cunningham's views. The money is to be raised by contribution from 
the alumnfe and others interested, these contributions to be paid either in advance 
or in yearly installments, to begin in December of 1S99, and to continue through 
five years. It will be necessary to raise about twenty-tive hundred dollars, of 
which six hundred dollars was pledged by the faculty of the School and the few 
members of the Association present at the June, 1899, meeting. 

Anyone who desires to contribute may pay in advance or on the installment 
plan. Hereafter, if you promise to pay on the installment plan, you will receive 
a notice on November 1 of each year. 

Dr. Cunningham was wideh' known and loved tln-ongliout the State; there- 
fore, we hope the alumme may obtain contributions from others not connected with 
the School. 

All correspondence and contributions should be sent to 

The Cunningham Memorial Scholarship CoionxTEE, 

State Female Normal School, Farmville, Va. 



Class of ifebruat^, 1900* 

"SEIN NICHT AUSSEHEN." 

VIVIAN COLGIN BIXNS. 

" True as her song." 
Home at Newport News, Virginia ; Member of Glee Club ; Member of German Club. 
Received Professional Diploma. 

JULIA GERTRUDE CHILTON. 

" 'Twas a girl with ej'es like two dreams of night." 
Is from Lancaster, Virginia ; Member of Glee Club ; Member of German Club. 
Received Full Diploma. 

ELIZABETH CULPEPER. 

" It is the mind that makes her rich." 
Home at Portsmouth, Virginia. Received Full Diploma. 

MARGARET WATKINS GOODE, K. A. 

" We had been lost without her." 
Home at Skipwith, Mecklenburg county, Virginia; Secretar}- Y. M. C. A., 1899-1900. 
Associate Editor of Annual, ' 99 ; Member of Dramatic Club, ' 99 ; Member of German Club. 
Received Full Diploma. 

CELIA HAWKINS, 

" You who teach ingenious youth ingeniously," 
Lives at Petersburg, Virginia. Received Professional Diploma. 

LILY HENDERSON HENING. 

' ' M}- kingdom for a co( .' " 
Home at Jefferson, Virginia. Received Full Diploma. 

ELIZABETH KELLOGG HOLLAND, 

"Fluttering, smiling, flirting," 
Is from Amelia, Virginia. Received Full Diploma. 

ANNA BRUCE HOUSTON, Z. T. A. 

"A man's the noblest work of God." 
Home in Lexington, Virginia. President of Class of February, 1900. 
Editor-in-Chief of Annual, 1900 ; Member of German Club. 
Received Professional Diploma, June, 1900. 

IDA MILLER HOWARD, 

"All's right with the world," 
Is from Pulaski, Virginia. Received Professional Diploma. 

PATSY JOHNS. 

" In truth she was not hard to please." 
Home at Sheppards, Virginia. Received Full Diploma. 

ELEANOR CARTER RANDOLPH, 

' ' Who so prompt as thou ? ' ' 
Lives at Greenville, Mississippi. Received Professional Diploma. 

ELIZABETH EGERTON WATKINS, 2. 2. 2. 

" I would as soon attempt to entice a star." 
Home at Hampton, Virginia. Historian of Class ; Associate Editor of Annual, '99. 
President of Dramatic C'lub. Received Full Diploma. 



A MED LEI 



{"HMo, Mtj Buhy.'") 

Good-bye, old Normal ; 

Good-bye, our schoolmates ; 

Good-bye, the Practice School. 

Honeys, we must retire ; 

But we'll set the world on fire. 

Now you will lose us, you won't abuse us. 

For you'll be left alone. 

Telephone a word when we are gone. 

{"Georgia Camp-meeting" ) 

I'll smile upon you if you'll smile upon me 
When we leave the Normal 

{"Jusl as the Sun Went Down") 

And take a last look at our old scliool friends, 
Just as we get our " dips. " 

{"Just One Girl") 

There is just one class, 
Only just one class ; 
There are others, we know, 
But this will all surpass. 
On the page of fame 
We will write our name. 
Where it will linger forever 
As just one class. 

("/ Think Til Have to Telephone My Baby") 

I think we'll have to telegraph the home-folks 

{"Hot Times") 

Tliere's a hot time for the old class to-night. 
When you come to see us get our "dip" 
You will all gatlier round and give us each a grip. 
There' s a hot time for the old class to-night. 

{"Sweet Marie") 

Graduating class of Feb. — 

Class of February, nineteen hundred year — 

Though forever we may part, we are ever joined in heart — 

Forever true to us and to you. 

{"Ben Bolt") 

(_)li, will you remember the Normal, class-mates, 
Tlie Normal, in years to come? 
Of our friends that we love, who are scattered af;ir. 
We will think often then, just as now. 

{"Home, Sweet Home") 

There is no school like our school ; 

No place more dear. 

And no class like our class 

Of nineteen hundred year. 

M. yv. G. 



our IN THE IFORLD TO ROAM. 



Tune : "Seeing Nellie Home." 

We, the class of nineteen liimdred, 
Stand before you now alone, 
And to-night we go from Alma Mater 
Out in the world to roam. 

Chorus : 

Out in the world to roam, 

Out in the world to roam, 

And to-night we go from Alma Mater, 

Out in the world to roam. 



We can carry our hard-earned sheep.skins 
With us where'er our home, 
For tonight we go from Alma Mater, 
Out in the world to roam. 

Chorus. 



On our lips the woi-ds may quiver, 
In our eyes the tears may come, 
For tonight we go from Alma Mater, 
Out in the world to roam. 

Chorus. 



A LOOK INTO rHE FUTURE. 



TuxE : "My Old New Hampshire Homestead." 

Many years have passed since we have been together ; 

Many years ago we parted — friends and I — 

From our school-mates ; and to know them was to love tlicin 

To these we said a sad and last "good-bye." 

We clung to one another as we parted, 

And hopefully we said we'd meet some day ; 

But alas ! we never more can be united 

In the dear old Farmville Normal, far away. 

REFE.ilN : 

Now the school-girls linger there, 

And the da}'S are just as fair, 

In the places where together we would roam ; 

But they know us now no more ; 

We'd be strangers at the door 

Of our dear old Farmville Normal, far awav. 

In ray dreams, by the School last niglit I wandered, 
And I thought I saw my class-mates by my side ; 
Once again, then, we laughed and talked together— 
Once again we promised we would true abide ; 
And, as I stopped to greet each one, I 'wakened ; 
I called my friends, but they had gone to stay. 
In my vision I had seen them all so happy. 
In the dear old Farmville Normal, far awav. 




PROPHECY OF FEBRUARY CLASS, 1900. 




IDA HOWARD. BRUCE HOUSTON. KEI.LOGG HOI,LAND. 





ViVIAS HINNS 



.tUI.IA CniLTON. 




ELIZABETH CULPKPER. 



MADGE GOODE. 





CELIA HAWKINS 



ELEAKOR KANDOLPH. ELIZABETH WATKINS. 








Class of June, 1900. 



President, GRACE ESTELLE ELOAN. 

Vice-President, SADIE ARMSTRONG. 

Secretary and Treasurer, MARGARET HALE. 

Historian, NANNIE ROYALL. 

Prophet, MARY COLEMAN. 



ROLL: 
SADIE BROWNING ARMSTRONG, RAri-AHANNocK Cuusxv. 
NORMA EOLENE CLEMENTS, Middlesex Corsxy. 
LAURA CHILTON, Lancaster County. 
GRACE ELCAN, Buckingham County. 

MAMIE KATHERINE RICHARDSON, King William County. 
LIDIE MILLER, Norfolk County. 
ELLA HAUPT, Loudon County. 
MARY CHANNING COLEMAN, Halifax County. 
HESSIE CHERNAULT, Prince Edward County. 
MAGGIE MAUDE SIBLEY, Warwick County. 
NANNIE HOBSON ROYALL, Powhatan County". 
VENNIE COX, Prince Edward County. 
HELEN MAY CRAFFORD, Warwick County. 
MARTHA MILLER, Prince Edward County. 
LOUISE MARIA DAVIS, Cumberland County. 

29 



HISrORT OF JUNE CLASS, igoo. 



In the month of fair September, 

In the year of ninety-seven, 

When the fields with sod were golden 

And the leaves with red were tinted, 

From the sunny, sandy seashore. 

From the mountains grand and lofty. 

From the bounds of the Old Dominion, 

Came Virginia's girls to Farmville. 

Tliere was dark-haired Helen Crafford 

From the wave-washed shores of \Varwick, 

And the gentle, quiet maiden, 

Vennie Cox, from old Prince Edward. 

Many others there were also ; 

And they toiled and thought and studied 

Through the winter months that followed, 

Till at last, vacation coming. 

Left they Farmville bare and lonely. 

But swiftly sped the passing summer, 

And September with its beauties 

Came again, and summer pleasures 

All were left, but not forgotten ; 

And the girls came back to study, 

Bringing many others with them ; 

And there were among the strangers 

Norma Clements, firm and sturdy — 

Type of Middlesex, her county ; 

And a tall and slender maiden, 

Sadie Armstrong, joins us also ; 

And as fall lapsed into winter 

Came another, Mary Coleman — 

Oh, so dignified and learned ! 

Oh, so versed in arts of wisdom ! 



Then the j'oungest one among us, 

Laura Chilton, bright and cheerful. 

Comes 'mid February's snow and freezing. 

And the class now numbers seven ; 

But at last the Junior reaching — 

Many coming wished to join us — 

Till in all fifteen they made us. 

First our president, Grace Elcan, 

Comes from Buckingham, so near us ; 

Then from Norfolk's busy center 

Lidie Miller, sweet and merry; 

And there is the wise and learned 

Mamie Eichardson from King William, 

And Ella liaupt— Oh ! boundless wisdom 

Brings she from the lofty mountains ; 

Maggie Sibley, stern, commanding, 

Who rules the Practice School so well ; 

Then our hard and earnest student, 

Margaret Hale, so dignified. 

And Louise Davis — Oh, so jolly ! 

She from Cumberland, comes among us ; 

And from our own town of Farmville, 

Meri-y, laughing Martha Miller, 

And Ilessie Chernault, calm and (juiet, 

Ladylike in all her actions. 

So fifteen we are together — 

We, the girls of Nineteen Hundred — 

And we hate to leave the Normal, 

Hate to go away from Farmville ; 

But our duty calls us elsewhere — 

So we bid you all "good-bye." 

Nannie Hob.son Koyall. 



PROPHECY OF THE CLASS OF JUNE, 1900. 



IN MYTHOLOGY we find many instances of the gods revealing the future 
to men. Some say that destinies are not revealed in this day and gene- 
ration, but that question I shall leave to my readers to decide, after 
having carefully considered the events recorded in the following veracious 
narrative : — 

One night, a few ^veeks ago, I was arcjused from m}' slumbers by a myste- 
rious noise, and my heart suddenly leaped iu fright as I beheld a ghost-like 
Presence approaching my bed. This Presence, or Spirit, beckoned to me, and, 
drawn by some powerful unseen force, I arose and followed him. AYheu we had 
reached the outside air I was suddenly euvi'loped in a cloud of darkness, and felt 
myself swiftly carried to parts unknown. 

Then the Spirit said, "Let there be light." I opened my eyes, and found 
myself in a studio, surrounded by all the heterogeneous miscellany with which 
those erratic geniuses, artists, love to surround themselves. Seated at work upon 
an unfinished picture was the artist. Enveloped as she Mas in an enormous apron 
besmeared with many colors, and with several distinct splotches of green and 
yellow ornamenting her countenance, I failed to recognize her. But, finding 
something familiar in her face, I ventured to ask the Spirit who this might be. I 
was told that it was my former class-mate, now the distinguished artist. Norma 
Clements. 

Suddenlv the cloud again enveloped and carried us off. Soon I found myself 
in a great lecture hall, with a high arched ceiling, and adorned with splendid 
works of art. On the rostrum a woman was earnestly pleading the cause of 
woman's rights to a large and attentive audience. Again I ventured to ask the 
Spirit who this was, and was told that it was the famous woman's suffrage lec- 
turer, Maggie Sibley. 

Another scene presents itself. Out in the moonlight I see a brown-haired 
maiden ruthlessly draM'ing under her spell a "green," callow youth. From a few 
words I overheard I easily recognized my old friend, Helen Crafford. The Spirit 

31 



further inforiiicd me that slie had contracted this habit of flirting while at the 
Normal, and that it had grown on her to such an extent that she had never been 
able to stop it. 

After this the S])irit led me into a large lecture room in a celebrated college. 
Seated at the desk was a portly (?) spectacled woman, wiio was delivering a lecture 
on the "Solar System " to a large class of students. The lecturer I soon recog- 
nized as my old class-mate, Sadie Armstrong. As I left the room I thought I 
heard her say something about tiie Xorth star and the zenith, but I was not sure. 

Then we were again cauglit up l)y the cloud and borne to a doctor's office, 
furnislied in very handsome style. On the door I saw this inscription : " Dr. 
Grace Elcan. Hours, 9 to 3. Specialty, Diseases of the Heart." 

As I fiuished reading this I heard the sound of a bell ; it became louder and 
louder. The darkness which had enveloped us began to lighten and the Spirit to 
fade away. " O, Spirit, stay ! " I called. " There are so many others of whose 
destinies you have not told me. Surely all their lives — for many whose names 
you have not mentioned were leaders among us — have not been failures? For 
there was Vcnnie Cox, our mathematician ; Nannie Royall, our poetess ; Ella 
Haupt, our geographer; Margaret Hale, our studious girl; Laura Cliilton, our 
clever girl ; Mamie Richardson, our ideal teacher ; Martha Miller, our merry girl ; 
Lidie Miller, our dignified girl ; Douise Davis, our popular girl, and I myself, 
whose futures you have not revealed to me." 

Whde I was still speaking the Spirit opened before my eyes a ponderous 
volume, tiie Virginia Public School Records for 1901, whose pages were forever 
made glorious by the presence of these beloved names. 

Looking up, T saw that the Spirit had Aanislied, and now the sound of the 
bell had become quite clear. I woke with a start to find tliat it was all a dream, 
and to hear the bell ringing for fifteen minutes before breakfast. 

Mary Channixg Colejian, 1900. 




Class of J^cbvuat^, 
1901. 



Class Flower : 

La France Rose. 

Class Colors : 

Garnet and Gray. 



OFFICERS : 



MARY B. DANIEL, . 
BESSIE ^WELLS, . . . 
MARION WATKINS, 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



ROLL: 

ELIZABETH BALDWIN, Buckingham County. 

LIZZIE BRY.-VN, York County. 

BESSIE KOSSKR CARPER, Botetourt County. 

M.\Ih;k ( ARTKK, I'uince Edward County. 

LILl.V.X CIIKATII.VM, I'KixrE Ed\v.\rd County. 

.lESSlK EI.Wool) (O.X, Nui; FOLK County. 

MKL'CY M.VKCVIiKr (KIM. Ioudon County. 

ELIZ.U'.I:TH .^I.MtlK ( rUTIS, JIenrico County. 

SALLIE DANIEL, Cumberland County. 

MARY DANIEL, Charlotte County. 

SADIE DOUCtLASS, Norfolk County. 

ESSU': HARRIS, Prince Edward County. 

LH.IAN IKiOK, Highland County. 

MA I! II': Ki:sLER, Roanoke County. 

EMMA M.\i:RI'I)1':K, Shenanixiah County. 

]SIAt l( : I !•: .!( )Si;i'II I XK .M.VXWELL, Tazewell County. 

HALLli: KASLKY OWEN, Halifax County. 

LV///AK coTTdN I'lNNKU, Nansemond County. 

ID.\ SIIAKI'K. W'AMiiN.rioN County. 

H'CIA SCOTT, I'.iwiiATAN- County. 

DAVIE TAYLdK, a, ...mac County. 

BE.SSIE WELLS, Cii i>i kufibld County-. 

PEARL WATTI:i;s().\, M.jntgomery County. 

MARI.VN WATKI.XS, Chesterfield County. 

iAII.XTA WYXNK, Warwick County. 

JANIE AVILLIAMS, Buckingham County'. 

JESSIE E. WHITJIORE, Rockrridge County. 

ANNIE WHITEHEAD, Isle of Wight County. 

35 




Class of June, 
1901. 



OFFICERS : 

JOSIE LUCK, 

President. 

REBECCA JANE AVIIE ALTON, 

Secketary. 

LUCY T. CONWAY STUBBS, 

Treasurer. 

KEBECCA JANE WHEALTON, 
Editor. 



MEMBERS : 

EMMA JOHN BARNES, Elizabeth City County. 

SARAH FRANCES H(Mi<;, Elizabeth City County. 

MARY' LOUISE HOG WOOD, Northampton County. 

JOSIE LUCK, Hanover County". 

SARAH ELIZABETH PALMER, Brunswick County. 

LUCY T. CONWAY STUBBS, James City County. 

REBECCA JANE WHEALTON, Accomac County. 

ALICE ATKINSON, Charlotte County. 

MARY POWELL FARTHING, Warwick County. 

MARTHA WATKINS FLOURNOY, Prince Edward County. 

JENNIE C. M. JACKSON, Prince Edward County. 

PORTIA LEE OWEN, Halifax County. 

MOLLIE ALLEN PHILLIPS, Elizabeth City County. 

FRANCES YANCEY SMITH, Charlotte County. 



^\m of f ebrwarv, \m. 



MARY ELIZA DENNY, Clarke County. 
SALLIE WILLET LEACHE, Pulaski County. 
LUCY HENRY AVOOD, Amelia County. 
FLORENCE WINFIELD, Dinwiddie County. 




1 Class of June, 1902. 



J 



OFFICERS : 



HARRIET PARKER HANKINS, 
President. 

MAMIE GROSSOLOSE, 
Vice-President. 

ETHEL STUART COLE, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 

CLARA HELOISE PBRCIFULL, 
Editor. 



ROLL: 

ETHEL ARVIK, Lunenburg County. 

EFFIE JOSEPHINE BATEMAN, Augusta County. 

JENNIE E. BRACEY, Prince Edward County. 

COEA LEE COLE, Spotsylvania County. 

ETHEL STUART COLE, Spotsylvania County. 

LELIA ALICE CHUMBLEY, Pulaski County. 

ISA McKAY COMPTON, Warren County. 

LUCY DIX EGLIN, Fairfax County. 

MABEL FURR, Loudon County. 

MAMIE GROSSCLOSE, Bland County. 

SALLIE PARKE OILMAN, Hanover County. 

ELIZABETH KATHLEEN HALL, Pulaski County. 

NANNIE HAUSER, Augusta County. 

OTELIA HARVIE, Amelia County. 

HARRIET PARKER HANKINS, James City County. 

EMMA LOIS KING, Fauquier County. 

WILLIE HARRISON MOORE, Mecklenburg County. 

SALLY RIVES MORRIS, Louisa County. 

BLANCHE MARTIN, Powhatan County. 

CLARA HELOISE PERCIFULL, Middlesex County. 

MARY FRANCES POWERS, Clarke County. 

ELLEN GILMER PAINTER, Pulaski County. 

JULIA A. SCAGGS, Spotsylvania County. 




Class of J^ebniav^, 
1903. 



OFFICERS : 

NANNIE HARRIS "WRIGHT, 

President, 

JAMES CITY COrNTY. 

CARRIE VIRGINIA HIX, 

Vice-President, 

A rri I.MAT re px (.utxt y. 

ELIZABETH GERTRUDE PIERCE, 
Secretary, 

NIIRFOI.K COUNTY. 

ANNIE LOtrCIOUS WALTON, Treasurer, 
SMVTiiio (.orN'rv. 

ROLL : 

SUE ANDERSON, Bappaitannock County. 

MARY EDMONSON BUCHANAN, Rockbridge County. 

EFFIE SUSAN EoTELER, Fauquikr County. 

ANNIE LOUISE BAKER, Orange County. 

MARY ELLA 11UK(!KV;, Prince Edward County'. 

HAKIME'I'I'E TltUE'l'L (o\VLF;S, James City County. 

AXXIE UorcnTY, Ac( (.MAC County. 

LOUISE OLIVIA EMMONS, Oiles County-. 

CARRIE STULDIVANT ( looDE, Mecklenburg County. 

MARY MAGILL OILKKKSOX, Culpeper County. 

ROBERTA WAIU) HUX'l', Pittsylvania County. 

0K.\ IIAPItIS, Prini 10 KmvARD County'. 

OEoK(ilA AILMISTEAI) J.VMES, Mathews County. 

CHLOE UoWAPJ) LACKEY, York County. 

ALICE MILLEH McALLISTER, Alleghany County. 

LEXA MAKSIIALL, Phinak Edward County. 

EM.MA ESTIIKi; OWENS, Spotsylvania County. 

CAPPIE CIUSMOXD PENDLETON, Spotsylvania County. 

:\rAi;Y II1:NI;V sriACKLEI'olU), Mathews County". 

MARTHA C()(_:KE TAYLOR, Amelia County. 




Class of ffebniaix 1904. 



OFFICERS 



SALLIE "WADE WALTON, President. 

DALIA LAM, Vice-President. 

REBECCA WALKER, . . . Secretary and Treasurer. 



ROLL: 

MAilY ADAMS, Loudon County. 

BUBIE AMOS, Cumberland County. 

BERTIE AMORY, York Cotnty. 

ROSA LEE ARNN, Pittsylvania County. 

NORA ANK ALLISON, Pulaski County. 

MARY BALDWIN, Prince Ed\vakd County. 

MINNIE BALTIMORE, Cumberland County. 

ELVA BAEROW, Prince Edward County. 

LUCY' CARY, Botetourt County. 

PLUMMER COLEMAN, Prince Edward County. 

GRACE CHRISTIAN, Chables City County. 

LUCY HANNAH DANIEL, Charlotte County. 

CATHERINE HOLLEY DREWRY, Sussex County. 

FANNIE LOLA DREWRY^ Sussex County. 

MAZIE DUNCAN, Accomac County. 

MARY GRAY FOSTER, Cumberland County. 

MARY" ELIZABETH EPES, Nottoway County. 

CARRY FOWLES, Poayhatan County. 

BESSIE MAY GILLIaM, Powhatan County. 

45 



IIATTIE GILLIAM, Towhatan County. 

LOUISE GODWIN, Northampton County. 

MARY VIRGINIA HOPKINS, Rockingham County. 

BLANCHE HILL, Louisa County. 

MARTHA HOLMAN, Amelia County. 

LELIA GRIFFIN JONES, Albemarle County. 

NORVELL JONES, Rockbridge County. 

LUCILLE KENT, Washington, D. C. 

MARY FRANCES LOWRY^, Hanover County. 

ANNA BELLE LEE, Buckingham County. 

DALIA LAM, Rockbridge County'. 

ANGIE POWELL, York County. 

KATE PRICE, Prince Edward County. 

RUTH PRICE, Loudon County. 

KATHERINE PARKER, Nanskmond County. 

MARY RICHARDSON, Henry Cousty. 

EMMA PE.VRLE READER, Princess Anne County. 

FRIDA SELDON, Prince Edward County. 

LAULA SIMMONS, Wythe County. 

HATTIE EARLY THOMPSON, Franklin County. 

IDA TATUM, Patrick County. 

SALLIE WALTON, Franklin County. 

MINNIE WARD, Accomac County. 

VIRGINIA AGNES WEBB, Fkanklin County. 

JULIA WRIGHT, Albemarle County. 

REBECCA WALKER, Henrico County. 

MARY' Y'ANCEY, Rockingham County-. 





All the girls who come to the Nor- 
mal conic for real work, but the old 
saving", "All work and no play makes 
Jack a dull boy," being no less applica- 
ble to girls than their brothers, one eve- 
ning of the week is set apart for social 
pleasures. 

This is Friday evening. Coming as it does, 
at the close of a hard week's work, its advent is 
hailed with delight, for on this evening the friends of 
V \ \ the opposite sex are permitted to call, and if there is any 
^■) entertainment in the town, the girls are allowed to attend, 

f' T' escorted either by Mrs. Morrison or Mr. Cox. All the enter- 
tainments given by the girls or by the Young Women's Christian Association are 
given on this evening. Thus the mind has an opportunity to rest, and by the 
next morning is ready for work again. 

Another privilege granted to the girls is that of attending church on Sunday 
nights with escorts. This is a pleasure not allowed in many schools, and it 
is consequently much appreciated. 

A. B. H. 



BACHELORS' REVERIES. 




JT is so easy to 
write about the 
things of wliich 
,^ ^ jr- one knows nothing. 

AV ii e n w e were 
^Waji- asked to write for 

I ' TheVieginian we dived 
into the " woman's cor- 
ner " of our lirains and 
brought out a luige mass 
of notions that we had 
been collecting for years, 
but had never had a chance to air 
before. And, Avhile we started out in 
all the confidence of utter ignorance, 
we discovered before we had finished 
that the matter was somewhat more complicated 
«jj>„~==^^s-^s«.^- than we had thought. But what we have written 

we have written, and whoso reads will pardon us if 
we have erred. These generalizations of ours are born of a long acquaintance 
with the Normal School. For four years \\e have eagerly imbibed every scrap of 
information touching the " Normalites " that we could secure; again and again 
we have recklessly flung away our father's hard-earned gold that we might get lost 
in some fair maiden's eyes. 

How well we remember the first time we ever called at the Xormal School ; 
how we forgot the girl's name -when we had rung the bell and came near having 
an epileptic fit on the door-step from fear that Ave could not remember it before 
the maid should come to the door ; how we sat on the edge of the chair in per- 
spiring agony, ransacking heaven and earth for something to say. And we recall, 
too, how we have strolled a long way with a fine careless air, as if \\'e had only 
come there by accident, when all the while we were watching the windows for a 
gliinpse of some dainty bit of femininity. 

Yes, it all comes back to us here at the end — just as it often did on the 
way back to Hampden-Sidney, when the niglit was so dark that charcoal looked 
white in it and the plunk of our horse's feet kept time to the patter of the rain- 
drops on our new hat. So we dedicate this product of our midnight toil with 
ink and quill to the " things that were, but are not ; " the things we never again 
shall know ; the girls who have made us wish it took five years to get a degree at 
Hampden-Sidney instead of only four ; and, lastly, to the neM'-born Vieginian. 




A. S. CALDWELL 
KUYKENDALL E. H. RICHAKDSON 

W.. C. BELL 



MY FIRST CALL AT THE NORMAL. 



IT is appointed unto a Freshman once to calieo, and after ealicoing — to despair 
forever. This is a haw of the social world as fundamental and of as universal ap- 
plication as is its correlative in the natural \vorld, which asserts, " Self-preservation 
is the first law of nature." When its truth first dawned upon me, while meditating 
upon my first experience at the N^ormal, I immediately began to search for its 
adherents in the world's great works of genius ; for I doubted not that some great 
thinker had long since formulated it into a guiding principle. I carefully reviewed 
the philosophic writings of Socrates, Aristotle, Plato and Cicero, and then plunged 
into the ever-augmenting sea of more modern philosophy, exploring its greater 
tributaries to their inception in the profound minds of Hegel, Kant, Locke, Mill, 
Spencer and others, but alas ! no success attended my efforts in this field. 

With undaunted zeal, however, I turned to the great evolutionist, Darwin ; 
followed closely the development of his admirable theor}' of man's origin in 
some remote organism, ouly to reach its consummation utterly disgusted at his 
silence concerning so significant a law, but more closely allied to that class of 
modest moderns who, in the light of tlio valuable knowledge afforded by him, 
are constrained to congratulate tliemselves that so many ages separate them from 
their primitive ancestry, wliose place of habitation was a bog, and whose sole 
means of communication a monotonous croak. 

With but a spark of hope left, I set sail on the stately old ship of science, 
with Newton at the helm, and a crew o? hardy seamen, composed of Kepler, 
Laplace, Gallileo, Franklin, Kelvin and others. I scudded with them the vast 
sea of theory, even into the very bowels of the earth, and then out into infinite 
space to worlds hitlierto unknown, only to return again to earth wearied with my 
fruitless search, but happy beyond degree to have learned tiiat Dame Fortune has 
hidden so fundamental a law from tlie wise and prudent and revealed it only 
unto inc. 

I realize, therefore, the great responsibility that no\v rests upon me in estab- 
lishing this law as a guiding principle for future generations. And while I shrink 
from the world-wide fame which its propagation will necessarily afford me, yet my 
altruistic nature constrains me to lay this corner-stone, above which will inevitably 
be erected the imposing structure of intricate and as yet wholly unknown social 
laws governing a Freshman's conduct. 

I earnestly solicit, then, the undivided attention of the liuman race to the 

ol 



narration of the following ineideiit, from which I deduced this universal law, 
believing that all will become convinced, even as I have, that it is simply unas- 
sailable, and hence a truism. 

Yes, without a doubt, the dream of my Freshman life was about to be 
realized. I had at last an engagement to call at the Normal. I here lay the 
note before me, written in a bold and legible hand, which read as follows : 

S. F. N. S. 
My Dear Mr. Sjiollett : 

You in town? How charmingly delightful ! ! ! No, I have no previous engagement for this 
evening, and, since Mrs. Jason does not object, will be very glad to have you call. 

Ver)' sincerely, 
Friday. Altberta E. Longside. 

In spite of my effort to retain my habitual calm and quiescent mien, I con- 
sciously grew increasingly nervous as I donned my hat and overcoat and set out 
from the hotel for the Normal. A few minutes' walk brought me within sight of 
the building, and as I approached the main entrance to the imposing structure I 
had many feelings of misgiving as to the result of this my first call, and heartily 
repented of my Freshman folly. Collecting mj'self as best I could, however, I 
walked straight up to the large double doors, paused long enough to assure myself 
that every hair was in place, no mud on my shoes and my tie on straight ; then 
pulled vociferously at the bell. Great heavens ! The thing sounded to me like 
the sudden outburst of a brass band, and it set my heart thumping like a big- 
bass drum. 

I hadn't time to regain my self-control before the servant opened the door 
and presented a waiter for my card, and at the same time exposed me to the gaze 
of a dozen or more girls assembled there in the hall by chance. 

I was completel}' unnerved by this unwelcome surprise, as my actions soon 
evinced. I first pulled frantically at my glove — which, of course, would not be 
removed, since, in my eagerness to extract my hand, I had forgotten to unloose it 
— and then, in my consternation, I dived into my overcoat pocket in search of a 
card. INIy embarassment was enhanced, too, by an audible titter coming from the 
direction of the group of girls, occasioned perhaps by the pert observation made 
by one of them, " He seems to be a stranger in a strange land." 

How many pockets I explored, or how many times I rummaged through 
one and the same pocket within the brief period of two minutes, vainly endeavor- 
ing to produce a card, I am now unable to say, but I am quite sure that my 
appearance woidd have been no more ludicrous, nor my capers no more frantic, had a 
nest of hornets suddenly infested my trousers. 

In the midst of my dilemma the old negro servant — thanks to her thought- 

52 



fulness — came to iiiv rescue l>v in(lui^in^■ in a most sympathetic tone, "Who is de 
young- lady yer wants, mister, and what name mout I 'nounce to her?" 

I am satisfied that the temperature of my body dropped twenty degrees as 
I blurted out, " I wish to see Miss Aliberta liongside, and my name is Smollett," 
and saw the old negro hurry away to announce my arrival. I quickly removed 
my hat and overcoat, foolishly deposited them on the hat-rack there in the hall, 
and a moment later was nearly dumbfounded as I passed the group of girls, now 
nearly convulsed with laughter, and heard one of them observe as I entered the 
parlor that my tie appeai'ed to be on backwards, and another remarked that the 
length of my trousers foreshadowed a coming deluge. 

I gave a sigh of relief as the door closed behind me, wiped the great beads 
of perspiration from my brow, and, having seated myself on a divan in a remote 
corner of the room, began alternately to finger my tie and to entice, if possible, 
the bottom of my trousers to seek a lower level. 

Thus was I engaged when a sudden peal from the old door-ljell nearly raised 
me out of my seat, and a moment or two later five or six strange young fellows 
were ushered into the parlor. I noticed a look of disappointment appear on the 
face of the foremost one as he espied me seated on the divan, but never dreamed 
that any relation existed between the two, such as cause and effect. Not many 
moments elapsed before several of the young ladies entered, among them Miss 
Longside. Acting according to the directions of a manual on parlor etiquette, 
which T had carefully perused that morning, I sprang hastily to my feet in order 
to give the ladies the choice of seats. I can't say just how it was managed, but 
one of those experienced fellows contrived to work his way gradually around to 
that divan, and, when the confusion subsided, he occupied that seat with his girl, 
while I was seated on the opjjosite side of the room, receiving a very severe tongue- 
lashing from Miss Longside for having foolishly allowed myself to be deprived of 
my place. I was still in such a state of confusion, however, that I totally miscon- 
strued that young lady's words (none of which I had heard), and believing that she 
was narrating something which demanded that I should appear highly entertained 
if I wished to impress her favorably, instead of attempting some sort of an ex- 
planation, I unfortunately set up a continuous giggle. 

Of course Miss Longside soon became utterly disgusted with me, but, being a 
damsel of a generous heart, she chatted away incessantly until there was left abso- 
lutely nothing about which she might converse. But the tongue of a female was 
destined to wag, and, rather than come to a standstill, she innocently resorted to a 
plan of escape, which nearly perfected my ruin forever. " Mr. Smollett," she 
suddenly exclaimed, " I want you to meet my room-mate. Miss Schweginwich, 
who is now sitting directly behind you on the opposite side of the room." 



Of course I would be deliiilited to meet lier friend, I said, and, turning my 
liead around in the direction indicated, Avas about to make some complimentar}^ 
remark upon her personal appearance, when suddenly, snap ! M'ent my rear collar- 
button, and the abominable collar flew up behind four inches above its normal 
adjustment. Men and devils ! What was I to do now ? The more I pulled the 
thing down on one side the higher up it would rise on the other. I taxed my 
ingenuity to the utmost, turning up my coat-collar, drawing down my neck, etc., 
but all in vain. My fidgety movements only served to attract the attention of 
every one present to my dilemma. An outburst of laughter immediately ensued, 
and heaven only knows what I would have done had not the bell at that instant 
chimed forth the signal for the visitors to depart. 

I was the first to exit, only to find a nice, round hole in the top of my hat, 
and my overcoat sewed up with not less than a bale of cotton, while neatly attached 
by a I)lue ribbon to the collar was a card, bearing this inscription : 

A Fres]iraan there was who came to call, 

As Freshmen sometimes do. 
But of .all the fools that have entered this Iiall, 

You're the greatest we ever knew. 

E. H. RrcHARDsoN. 




Ballabe of a IRovmalite 



AT HAMPDEN-SIDNEY. 




Each evening, at the proper time, 

I don some poem of a dress, 
In wliich I look — well just divine. 

Too sweet for anj-thing, I gness, 
And liasten down in happiness 

Ti) mingle in tlie giddy whirl 
( )f (ifty dancers — more or less — 

]"nr I'm a daint}' Normal girl. 

And then some cosy place I find, 

Some corner, where I look my Ijest, 
And where the swaying firelight shines 

In big gold bars upon my dress ; 
There is no doubt of my success, 

My liair is never out of curl. 
For ])leasure's sweetest votaress 

Is just a dainty Normal girl. 

I chatter gaily — 'tis no crime 

In undisguised lightheartedness, 
No bells disturb me with their chime 

No dry old books my soul oppress ; 
Sure, girls were never half so blessed, 

And never once in all the world 
Were half such charming things expressed 

About a dainty Normal girl. 

I,' ENVOIE. 

Don't lose your heads, boys — I confess 
My smiles of mingled pink and pearl 

Are meant — but not in seriousness, 
For I'm a dainty Normal girl. 



55 



AN INCIDENT. 



THE world was gloomy ciiouaii, I tliouglit, as I sat looking out of the window 
meditating on the many ills that befall mankind while grinding out his 
weary lot. The sun was shining brightly; in a large oak near the window a soli- 
tary mocking bird was making the air ring with his constant warble. On another 
day I would have enjoyed this, but to-day I was inclined to hurl a stone at the 
merry songster. I even envied the lot of a small street urchin who passed by 
the window with a grin on his dirty face, saluting every one whom he met with, 
"Shine, boss'.'" and exchanging jil>es with his I'ivals. Yes, I envied him, and 
would have gladly exciianged places with him for the time being — he was enjoying 
life, decidedly I was not. For I was in the dentist's office awaiting my turn at 
the torture — that awful chair, which reminds one of the chairs in which people 
were locked, with long spikes on every side — only the dentist's chair is a deceit; 
it looks so nice and inviting, but then the torment comes after. I would have 
been a fit subject for the asylum in a few moments had not a pleasant diver- 
sion presented itself 

For the door of the office opened and in walked the business manager of the 
Virginian, closely followed by the editor-in-chief as a reserve force. From the 
determined way in which the business manager opened the door and came into the 
I'oom it plainly showed that she was bent on business ; as for her chief, one cannot 
answer for her, for, as soon as she came into the room she started the ball rolling 
with the following : 

" Oh, doctor, what a lovely flower ; where did you get it? I wish I had one." 

The doctor, who had evidently heard something similar to that before, kept 
steadily at work, utterly oblivious to all remarks, and the editor-in-chief proceeded 
to sit down, but was called to attention by a frown from the business manager. 
Thus they awaited the doctor, seeming to view him as a monster who must be 
conquered, and I shall try to tell how they conquered him. 

Presently the doctor came over to them and inquired in a quiet tone, "What 
can I do for you?" in a manner which would lead one to believe that he knew 
exactly what was to come. After reassuring glances from one to the other, the 
business manager began : 

"We came to see you about our Annual." 

"Want me to buy one?" said tJic doctoi-. 

50 



" Yes — no, that wasn't it ; wo want you to advertise in it." 

"How much do you want me to take?" 

"Two pages," was the quiek reply; "you ouglit to; please do, doctor." 

" What would I do with all that ".' I only want my name put in," answered 
the doctor. 

The editor-in-chief, who had merely been looking on approvingly at the bold 
sallies of the business manager, here came to the rescue. 

"Doctor, you ought to ; you make enough money out of the girls." 

How the doctor could withstand the smiles and entreaties I cannot tell, but 
he did ; he must have been accustomed to it. 

"But I only want to put my name in," persisted the doctor. 

" Well, we can give you a page in the front, and you could write your name 
in the middle of it; it would be a big ad.," said the business manager. Mho evi- 
dently was out for bear. 

However, the doctor seemed inclined to think that this "big ad." was too 
big, so he asked : 

" How much is a quarter of a page ? " 

" Three dollars," said the business manager. 

" Well, put me down for that." 

" Doctor, you are perfectly lovely, though you might have taken two pages." 

The doctor merely smiled and said, " Of course, you are going to give me 
a book ■? " 

This was so unexpected an attack that they fled through the door without 
stopping to reply, and the doctor smiled again and went back to ^vork. 

I continued my meditations, but the gloom was dispersed, and I wished it 
had been longer — not the gloom, but the visit. 

A. S. Caldwell, Jr. 




THE MAGI'S ROSE BUD, 



As I SAT one evening, almost liiddon in tlie white elouil tliat rose from my 
meersclianm, I fell asleep and dreamed a dream wiiieli I shall endeavor to 
relate in the following lines : 

I dreamed that I was surrounded by a realm of bliss, as I strolled along 
'neath the leafy foliage of a boautiful fjrest. I could hear the sweet singing of 
the Baltimore Oriole, the mournful wail of the dove, as if grieving over the loss 
of a dejDarted friend ; the s\TCet fragrance of the wild flowers thrilled me witii a 
new sense of happiness ; the rustle of the leaves kept time witii the rippling music 
of the tiny brook, as it tridded down over its mossy bed ; in fine, all nature 
seemed sublime. 

It was while in this enraptured state of mind that I stooped and plucked a 
dainty rose-bud, beckoning me in the most graceful manner, as if to say, " I have 
wonders to relate." Such indeed ^vas the case, for as I removed, one b}' one, the 
petals from this little gem, the most wonderful secrets were revealed to me. 

First, I found myself standing once more before those A\alls of science of the 
old Normal School, greatly astonished at the wonderful changes which time had 
wrought in this classic spot. While tiius engaged my attention was attracted by 
the heart-rending scene of a middle-aged man reclining against tlie half-decayed 
old fence, and apparently in the last stages of despondency. 

Being of a philanthropic turn of mind, I accosted this forlorn-looking 
creature in the hope of cheering his drooping spirits. Upon drawing near him I 
heard him faintly muttering these words : " My once fond hope has vanished." 
Maud had forsaken him and clung to another, merely for the sake of pecuniary 
gain. 

In my next presentation I was glancing over the leading newspaper of the 
day, and at the iiead of the advertising column, in letters which could not be 
overlooked, were read these words : 

WANTED. — A Man with money galore, and 
acquainted witli subordination. 

[Signed], A. B. H. 

This, I must confess, somewhat astonished me, and put an end to my 
investigation. 

Soon after\vards I encountered a maiden lady, who, as is usual in such cases, 
began to recount the don/ of her young days ; how she had, b}' her charming 
manners and graceful elegance, won the sincerest admiration of many a poor man, 
only to send him away broken hearted, not fearing that another and better oppor- 
tunity would not be presented ; but alas, she had taken one step too far. Grace 
had ceased to be a fortune, age had become master, and she was left to live out 
the result. 

However, she still possessed one grace, of which not even age could deprive 
her, and that was the name. Late one afternoon I was strolling along a walk 



beloved of yore, and was startled by the sight of a woman wjio lay prostrate on 
the ground. Immediately I ran to her assistance, but she refused my aid, crying 
out in Archimedean tones, "Noli turbare meos circulos." Her name, I afterwards 
learned, was Whealton — somewhat notorious for her mathematical achievements. 
On my return might be seen a great assemblage of middle-aged women 
streaming out of an edifice whose dome seemed to pierce the celestial sphere. 
When I inquired the meaning of this I was told that these were members of the 
RoyaU society. No one seemed to know the object of this society ; the origin of 
the name was known, and also at its meetings were discussed topics varying in 
gravity from the anecdotes of IMother Goose to the great First Cause. The next 
day I was handed a pamphlet containing a full account of the proceedings of this 
body. The first article which arrested my attention was a review of Carhart's 
University Physics. I only remember the satirical comment on the author's 
inability to define electricity, and the striking analogy drawn between Galileo's 
inclined plane and the fate of Jack and Jill in Mother Goose. Margaret Hale 
had made her debut as a critic. The next paper, which I read with some interest, 
was entitled, " The Right of Intermarriage Among Cousins." Lizzie Pierce 
brought forward a striking and impressive argument denying this right, but I 
was told that she had not always been of this opinion. 

J. S. KUYKEXDALL. 

[Note by Editok. — The wi'iter was not able to complete his article, being called home, at 
this point, by serious illness in his family.] 




PRIZE VERSES. 

According to the aunouncement made by the staff, a prize, in the shape of 
a copy of the Annual, has been awarded to Miss Nannie Hobson Eoyall, from 
Powhatan, for the best verses offered to the committee. For reasons that we shall 
not take space to give, no award has been made for a story, though we publish a 
number of sketches and storiettes which came to us by the ordinary channels, and 
which were not sent in to compete for the prize. 

REPEy^T. 

The sliades of night were falling fa-st, 
As by the panes of painted glass 
A girl stood weeping, sad and soi'e, 
For in her trembling hand she bore, 
Repeat. 

Her brow was sad ; her eye beneath 
Flashed like a falchion from its sheath. 
As, looking on the paper white. 
The one short word broke on her sight. 
Repeat. 

In other rooms the merry sound 

■ ■ Of girls rejoicing did abound; 

The fire sparkled, the bright lights shone, 
But from her lips escaped a groan, 
' ' Repeat. ' ' 

O! do not weep, her room-mate said, 
And let me rub your aching head. 
Our hearts to you are open wide; 
But low and faint the voice replied, 
' ' Repeat. ' ' 

" O! come," a fair friend said, and rest 
Thv weary head upon ray breast; 
The tears stood in the sad blue eyes. 
But still she answered with a sigh, 
" Repeat." 

That night when all with sleep were bound, 
The halls rang with a frantic sound; 
It echoed down the winding stair. 
It reverberated through the air — 
" Repeat." 

At dawn of day, on her snow-white bed. 
The maiden fair was lying dead; 
A laudanum bottle near her lay. 
And something ever seemed to say, 
"Repeat." 

There, in the morning cold and gray, 
Lifeless, but beautiful, she lay. 
Still grasping in her hand so fair 
With the frantic clutch of dire despair, 
' ' Repeat. ' ' 

Nannie Hobson Royall. 



rHE TEST- PAPERS. 



How far from this heart are tlie scenes of the scliool-room, 

When accidentally they are presented to view! 
The benches, the blackboard, the ne'er smiling teacher. 

And each hated spot that ray pupilship knew. 
The long, winding hall, and the class-room beside it; 

The desk, and the chair where our teacher sat down; 
And oh! what a sigh when we all did file by it, 

And saw the dread test-papers handed around — 
The hated test-papers, the dreaded test-papers, 
The heart-rending test-papers handed around. 

The hated test-papers — I dream of them sleeping. 

They are the first visions my waking thoughts know; 
They drive me distracted, they set me to weeping — 

When "N. P." is on them, oh, how my tears flow! 
With eyes that are red and with heart in a flutter, 

I rush to my room and my grief try to hide, 
And dream of the ills that taunted me ever; 

Those hated test-papers — they're driving me wild. 
The tear-bringing papers, the hated test-papers. 
The dreaded test-papers — they're driving me wUd. 



Hebe G. Kandolph. 





Mr RIVAL. 



Oh, thecliange that has come over Jim! 

He is a "sub" on the Varsity team; 
He writes of a struggle dark and dim, 

But a victory now won supreme. 

I can't in the least understand his part, 

For I was once his all in all; 
But Vm not the "idol of his heart," 

For he worships the god ' ' Foot-ball.' ' 

Of his life / was to be the star, 

vSo he said once; but now 'tis this: 
In the game of the year he'll be the star. 

And the last will be the greater bliss. 

He writes me no longer of his love; 

He sends me accounts of the score, 
On the headings of the paper above. 

The trash of which I'll read no more. 

When he comes his face is black and blue. 
And I weep, for I tremble for his life; 

Then he tells me the glorious feats he'll do — 
Of "touch-downs" and other terms of strife. 

Then away he goes without "good-bye," 

Though he knows my eyes with tears are blind. 

To get killed on the tield he seems to trv, 

With not one thought for the girl left behind. 



Margaret Watkins Goode. 



AMONG THE GRADUATES, 



JUST why school days are so often the happiest has never been fully told. But 
the heart turns to the academic halls where echo evermore to us the footsteps 
of those M'ho led us in the path of knowledge. Frequently, however, old 
students make no sign of their love for a school. The cares of this world, and 
perhaps — who knows ? — the love of riches, prevent them from taking time to send 
a word to the old Alma Mater. 

Some do write, however, and a few come again to the old place. Here and 
there, too, we pick up a bit of news about others. To go back to the class of '86, 
Miss Parrish, as every one knows, is Professor of Mathematics at the R.-M. W. C. 
at Lynchburg. She delivered the address to the Alumnaj here last Jane. She 
has recently published in the ReUgious Herald a series of articles on " The Educa- 
tion of Girls," which have attracted a great deal of attention. Lula McKinney, 
of the Agnes Scott Institute, expects to study at the North next year. Madeline 
Mapp is visiting in New York City. Carrie Brightwell (Mrs. Hopkins) lives at 
Bedford City. Julia Johnson, '87 (Mrs. Eggleston), is the wife of Superintendent 
of Schools of Asheville, N. C. She is in Farmville at the present writing with 
the loveliest baby in the world, Elizabeth Carrington Eggleston. Fanny Berkeley, 
'88, teaches at Salem, and, they say, grows better and better every year, which is 
incredible. Josie Winston (Mrs. Woodson) is frequently at her father's home in 
Farmville. 

Half the class of Febrnars^, '89, are married. Lucy BoswcU, as liandsome 
as ever, is resting this year, or, rather, is teaching a few ciiildren at the Maple 
Sliade Inn, Pulaski. Fanny Littleton, of the June class, will take the B. S. 
degree at Cornell this year. She is a Science teacher at the S. F. N. S. Mrs. 
Hardy, '91, is now Mrs. Claiborne. Mary Womack teaches in Adelphi College, 
Brooklyn. Louise Twelvetrees, '92, was in Europe last year, but is now at her 
home near Farmville. Mary Patience Blackmore is the same fine Mary, "so folks 
say," and makes her influence felt in the High Sciiool at Hampton. Lelia Jeffer- 
son Harvie teaches Mathematics at the Normal, and has the classes iu Physics 
during Miss Littleton's absence. Elva Thomson (Mrs. Walker) lives at West 
Point, Va., and is as happy as the days are long. Sally Pritchett is a member of 
tlie Normal Faculty, and is said to be the best tennis-player here. Ella Trent 
(Mrs. Pendleton Taliaferro) lives in Brooklyn. 

Of the class of '93, Mary H. Boyd (Mrs. Cabell Flournoy) frequently visits 
Farmville. Her son, Patrick Fitzgerald, is a beautiful child. Nettie Morton has 
a few private pupils at her home. Jane Tabb lives at Hampden-Sidney. Rosalie 
Morton, whom to know was to love, died several summers ago. Pearl Cunning- 
ham, '94 (Mrs. Boyle), presides over some department of a large school at Rocky 
Mount, N. C. Virginia Greever is a full-fledged society girl, yet without the lack 
of earnest purpose which is sometimes attributed to that type of womanhood. She 

63 



has kopt in close toncli with the Schonlj and comes to Farniville once or twice 
every year. Another 'S)4 gii-1 who does not forget us is Mand I'oUard. Last year 
she spent several weeks in Farniville, and Mdiile here read and recited for us a 
number of times in her own natural, inimitable wa}-. IMattie Buchanan is teach- 
ing at Judge Watkins's, near Farniville. Appearances indicate that she is enjoy- 
ing the world and its passing show. 

There are twenty-five girls who were graduates in Jnne, '95, and Sue Raney 
is the only one of these wlio is married. Nelly Wicher is a trained nurse in 
Philadelphia. Kate Stone has given up her position and is enjoying home life in 
Roanoke. It is said that her favorite i^ursuit now is golf. It was rumored last 
year that she and Lucy Bosw'ell were about to publish a book for teachers, a 
Manual of Opening Exercises, but we have heard nothing of it lately. Robbie 
Berkeley, '96, has music pupils at her home here, and takes German at the School. 
Margaret McCabe is on the staff of a magazine in AVashington. The artist of 
the class, Loulie Morton, is studying in New York at the Art League. Martha 
Kennerly, '97, is at Adelphi College, Brooklyn. ]Mattie AVainwright is now Mrs. 
AVhitehead, and lives at Farniville. She is one of the good girls who came back. 
It is hard to imagine airy fairy Polly in charge of a school of her own, yet Mary 
AVhiting Chisman, '98, has a prosperous class in a Hampton school. Louise Otley 
is now Mrs. Koiuer, and lives in Augusta county. Charlotte McKinney and 
Maiy Jackson are at home this year. Nelly Preston, '99, is visiting in South 
Carolina. Chatham has claimed the services of Brownie Taliaferro, and she has 
made a fine record there, as every one knew she would. Lucy Thornton, too, is 
succeeding in Southwest Virginia. There are now ten or more Normal girls in 
the Roanoke schools, Julia Vaughan, '99, among them. Ellen Armstrong is 
studying at AVard Seminary. Madge Goode and Bruce Houston, '00, are 
doing some light post-graduate work here and making themselves generally indis- 
pensable. Bruce Houston is editor-in-chief of the Annual. 

AVe have every reason to believe that the girls who have gone out from here 
with a diploma are doing good work for the Commonwealth, and we are only sorry 
that we have not recent news from more of them. AVherever they may be, we 
give them greeting and an invitation to come back to the old School. As a friend 
of ours would say, their names and personality are still remembered here. 

The death-roll since the ojjening of the School in '85 is not long, but on it 
are names that once stood for high hopes and great promise. Lovely Mary Agnew, 
'88 ; Mamie Meredith, '90 ; Rosalie Morton, '9?> ; Elvira Kean, '95, with whose 
bright ways and joyous motions one could not connect a thouglit of anything but 
life and freedom. Alas ! 




mas S ^ - 



A SCENE IN THE BLACK BELT. 



It was exceedingly liot. All day we had wandered iVoiu nioin to room in a 
vain search for a breath of fresh air. At last, when the sun had slipped from the 
coppery heavens, leaving everywhere wilted flowers and drooping leaves as signs 
of his power, we crept from behind our tightly closed blinds, and were once more 
beginning to breathe, when some one broke the delicious quiet by proposing that 
we should go to church. I confess that to me the idea was very unweleonie, and 
I even meditated opposition, but, being very comfortable, I decided to let some 
one else do the opposing. Having come to this momentous decision, I soon lost 
track of the convei'sation, and when I next heard, the plan had been adopted. 
Such being the case, I surrendered myself to fate, and so it came to pass that on 
a certain night in August I found myself seated, with five others, in a cart half 
full of straw and on my way to church. 

It had grown slightly cooler, and before we reached our destination I found 
myself actually enjoying the novel experience. The church proved to be an 
ordinary whitewashed structure, such as is usually found in a country place. The 
sermon, too, partook largely of the commonplace, and, upon the whole, I was glad 
to get out and be on my way home. As we were seating ourselves, however, one 
of the boys made a suggestion which met with instant approval. 

The horse was once more turned from the direction of home, and, leaving 
the main road, we contmued our way by means of a narrow track which skirted 
thick pine woods. The stars wei'e shining brilliantly. Presently the cresent moon 
appeared above the woods, sprinkling with silver the plumed tops of the pines 
and rendering all things ghostly. The air was pulsing with the hum of millions 
of insects, and at intervals the frogs awoke the echoes. At the end of half an 
hour the cart turned into a rough clearing, dotted over with strange shapes of 
roots and stumps. Here and there a giant pine lifted its head above the common 

65 



herd and stood outlined against the sky. In the center of the clearing was a long, 
low building, in outward appearance resembling a barn, except that it was supplied 
with innumerable windows, out of which streamed a flickering reddish light. 

Surrounding the house, and seemingly suspended in air, we could see the 
forms of men and womcD, the white dresses of the latter appearing strange and 
weird in the dim light. As we drew nearer we found that they were standing in 
carts and wagons, and apparently much interested in what -was going on in the 
house, from which now came a low, moaning sound, like the sighing of the wind 
in a forest. At times it rose to a shriek, and then died away in sobbing. 

By this time we had come very near. The cart was driven up to one of the 
windows, just beyond the light, so that a good view could be obtained of the 
interior, and we, too, looked in on the strange scene. My first impression was 
that of row upon row of black shining faces. They occupied every available sj^ace, 
and the perspiration flowed from them or stood in drops. Every face was turned 
toward the upper part of the room, where, on a raised platform, stood a tall and 
doubtless once powerful negro. 

He could not have been less than seventy years old. His head was as white 
as his own cotton patch, and as he stood with the torchlight flickering and dancing 
over his shrunken figure and withered face he was au object to excite the attention 
of the most casual observer. As my eyes rested upon him he moved to the front 
of the platform and began speaking to the people. At first his voice was low, but 
it gradually rose higher and higher, until the building rang with it, and he could 
have been heard half a mile away. Soon his effect on the negroes began to show 
itself. From a tense, almost strained, stillness, they began to rock. Backward 
and forward they moved their bodies, swaying and writhing. A groan was heard, 
then another and another. Now a low moaning was felt rather than heard. It 
grew louder and louder, now rising to a high, wild, minor plaint, now sinking in 
dull despair. 

Still the preaching continued. The torchlight flickered and flared; the smoke 
ascended in wreaths. The men and women swayed and writhed and moaned, 
lifting their haggard, streaming faces in the stifling air. 

Suddenly a woman shrieked aloud, and, throwing her arms over her head, 
fell forward over a bench. Instantly those nearest her lifted her upon her feet, 
when she tore herself loose, throwing herself about so wildly that two of the men 
had to come and hold licr. 

This seemed to be a signal for a general movement. Here and there 
throughout the house men and women sprang to their feet. With folded arms 
they would begin to shout, singing the while in a high, shrill voice. Gradually 
their movements would grow faster and faster, until breathless, with staring eyes, 

06 



reeling bodies and swaj-ing arms, they would sink upon tlic floor or throw them- 
selves violently across the benches. Tliis continued for iiours^. The thing that 
surprised me most was that no one was hurt. They would tall over, under and 
on benches in every possible and impossible attitude, l)ut nothing suffered in the 
least except their clothes. 

In connection with these, several laughable things happened. I remember 
especiall}^ a woman who wore a tight green satin basque. After becoming 
exhausted with shouting, she threw herself backwards over a bench, and when 
they picked her up her waist M'as split from top to bottom. This was soon 
mended, how^ever, for the sisters who had her in charge went over all the church 
borrowing needles with which to pin her up. 

At twelve o'clock we started for home, leaving the meeting in full swing. 
Aunt Susan's breakfast was not so good as usual the next morning, but we readily 
forgave her. 

iloLLiE Phillips. 



DAWN. 



Theough tlie gray mantle drawn o'er all the earth 
A faint light gleams, which heralds the fair da}', 
And in the east the clouds which once were gray 
Blush crimson, as abashed. But now the dearth 
Of sound is broke, for overhead, in glee 
A thousand birds break forth in song, and then 
The sleeping flowers raise up their heads again 
To drink the clear, fresh air and brighter be. 
But now, the crimson in the clouds turns gold, 
The sun himself springs up and smiles on all; 
The mist from everj'where away has rolled, 
And Nature, waking, heeds the morning's call; 
The breeze springs up and, whistling, sweeps away 
The night, and aids the coming of the day. 



Sallie Whillett Leache. 



HAWTHORNE'S ENGLISH, 



I MAY seem somewhat audacious in attempting to criticise as fine a writer as 
Hawthorne, but our class has been so well trained and has so well digested Genung 
that not even its dullest member would hesitate to correct Shakespeare, the writer 
of all writers. 

After a thorough study of Genung, I could not help noticing that in the 
expression, "pitiful a minority," Hawthorne wished to express the thought that the 
few at Blithedale with sucli noble motives deserved to be pitied by the vast ma- 
jority of the outside world, but instead of using the word '' pitiable" he misused 
"pitiful," which gives the sentence just the opposite meaning. Reading on further, 
I found "healthy occupation," and I said, " Healthy, healthy ; that is, healthy, 
whicli has health," and I at once began to picture a robust occupation, but, as I 
had never seen one, I found it much easier to sti'ike out " healthy " and put " health- 
ful" in its place. But I cannot forgive him for saying " domestic avocations," when 
speaking of the work done by the women at Blithedale. That was their business, 
and not a side occupation, and he should have recognized it as such by saying 
" domestic vocations." 

And then he makes Mr. Coverdale say " I will be painted in my shirtsleeves," 
when speaking of how their pictures would appear in the town hall of Blithedale 
years after they were dead. It was simply a prophecy, expressed only futurity, 
and, of course, should have been " I shall be painted in my shirtsleeves." 

He also uses " kind of a glance," and our class at once recognized that the a 
was superfluous. 

Occasionally he brings in a provincialism, such as " riyht good fire;" and 
then again he gets very poetical, and says " me thought ;" and he invariably applies 
the term yeoman to Silas Foster, wiien he was simply hired to manage the form, 
but owned not one foot of its snil. 

When I came across the expression, "Can I speak with you?" and "To 
prevent me laughing at him," I was carried back to my old First A days, when I 
was told, over and over again, to say " may," when asking permission ; also, " The 
possessive case of the pronoun should precede a participle used as a noun," and, 
instead of saving " To prevent me laughing at him," to say " To prevent my laugh- 
ing at him." 

Perhaps in my criticism 1 liave l)een unjust to Mr. Hawthorne, for all this 
may have been good English in his time. If snch was the case, I humbly beg his 
pardon. 

Rebecca Jane Whealton. 

68 



IMITJriONS OF WELL KNOJFN 
AUTHORS. 



THE STONE AND THE STICK. 

I DEOPPED a stone from a window high ; 
It fell to earth — I knew not wliy; 
It fell very fast, but did I know 
Wliat liad caused it to fall just so? 

I tln-ew a stick into the air ; 
It fell to earth. Why? Did I care? 
The stone and the stick I knew did fall ; 
They fell quite fast, and that was all. 

Long, long afterwards, in a book 
I found what caused the course they took : 
The earth — our great big ball, j'ou know- 
Had drawn them, and they fell just so. 



Cora Lee Cole. 



NOT AT ALL CONCEITED. 

School ended, I shall try 

My gain or loss thereby ; 
Take bad and good together, as ' t was fated ; 

And I shall weigh the same — 

Give school its praise or Ijlame. 
Young, these things lay in doubt; I'll know all, graduated. 



MOLLIE PniLLlP.S. 



LOT'S WIFE. 

Let us now .start and go out of this city, 

^Valking together. 
Leave we the Sodom doomed, j'ou and my ilaughters : 

We'll cross the heather. 
To be ourselves made go from the destruction 
Which had consumed us here in its mad fury. 
Thus were our sins avenged and tlie law carried 
Bv the hard sentence thrown Heaven's jiigh jurv. 



MAI!(iAHET WaTKTN.S GoODE. 



WHAT WOULD IT BE ? 



The day was a snowy one. It had been snowing for two days without stop- 
ping, and for this reason I had not taken my usual walks. It was with a weary 
feeling that I came up to my room at recess to wait for dinner. After putting 
away my books, fixing my hair, and having gone several times to the window, I 
sat down with my book to read. Tiie story was uninteresting, so I closed it as 
the thoughts of dinner came to me. I wondered what we should have. A load 
of turkeys had gone by in the morning, so we would have turkey for one thing. 
Of course we would have tomatoes, beans and potatoes — we usually did. I wished 
the bell would ring, for I was getting impatient, as we all do when we get very 
hungry. I walked to the window again, but nothing was there, except snow, 
snow. Occasionally a day jDupil would come out on her way to dinner. 

At last tiie long-listened-for sound was heard, and I was among the first to 
get in the dining-room. There I found fresh linen ; it must be dessert day, and I 
had forgotten it. Now the question was, what would it be? Soon I saw some 
plates on the sideboard. It was something to be served on plates. It could not 
be ajjple pie — we had just had that on Saturday. Perhaps it was cake, -with 
sauce ; but, no, it could not be, for there were spoons on the table. What could 
be eaten from a plate and witii a spooa ? I was at a loss to know. Perhaps it 
was peaches and cake, and the servant would bring the saucers later. I thought 
of how much I would enjoy them, for it is one of my favorite desserts. 

When we had finished eating I held up my hand for the servant and told her 
she could take the plates. She said she would be back in a minute, and went to 
get something for another table. The next thing I heard was a tap of the bell, 
and I reluctantly left the dining-room. 

Blanche Vest Hill. 



THE NEW MINISTER, 



One winter evening about dusk, in a comfortable bed-i-oom of a country 
home, a girl might have been seen pacing the floor. Her father was an officer in 
the church near by, and, being a hospitable man, his liomc was always open to 
ministers. The former preaclier having resigned, a new one had been sent to that 
charge. The old gentleman liad written to him to invite iiim to his home on 
Saturday, and to go with them to churcli Sunday. 

As all who live in tiie eotuitry know, tlie coming of a new minister to a 
neighborhood is an event of no little importance, especially if he be young and 
unmarried. All ! that was tiie theme over which the young girl was racking her 
brain. No one could tell her anything about him, except that his name was 
Hamilton, which she thought sounded very pretty. " I don't think he is married," 
she said to herself; " if he were, father would have known it." Then she remem- 
bered that her father had received only a postal card, saying that Mr. Hamilton 
had been sent to that charge, and of course it was not probable that it would have 
been stated on a card, even if he were married. But, oh, joyful thought ! there 
was no parsonage on that charge, and a man with a family would hardly be sent 
to a church that had no parsonage. Then came the recollection that several )-ears 
before they had had a married minister, and that he had rented a house. " So he 
may not be unmarried, after all," she thought. She grew tired of walking up and 
down the room, and, after casting a lingering glance down the road, she sat down 
by the fire and studied the flames, still puzzling her mind over the momentous 
question. 

She decided not to curl her hair or don her best suit until he arrived ; then, 
if he proved to be old or ugly, she would be saved the trouble. Listen ! The 
sound of wheels coming down the road made her start and rush to the window. 
Peering into the darkness, she could distinguish the form of a horse and buggy, 
but nothing more. " From the sound of the horse's feet he must be driving rap- 
idly," she thought; "therefore he must be a young man. "Old men don't usually 
drive fast." Basing her hopes on this, she began to curl her hair. Her father 
went out to meet the stranger, and, with her face pressed close to the window, .she 
heard the minister's manly " Good evening," in response to her father's greeting. 
She thought he must be young, because his voice was loud and strong. In her 
haste to be dressed she burned her hair until the whole room smelled of it. As 
the men walked up to the front door they passed the window of a lighted room 
and she caught a glimpse of the minister. He was tall and nice-looking, but she 
did not see his tiice. She heard nuich laughing and talkiug in the room below. 

71 



He must bo a good-iiatiircd man. No doubt lie would bo an agreeable addition to 
her circle of friends. And he would take her to church to-morrow, and all the 
girls would be jealous. Of course he -would stay at her home a great deal, and she 
would have some one to play tenuis with. Just then she heard footsteps on the 
stairs, and found that her father was showing the guest to his room, which was 
next to hers. After her father had gone down she heard the minister humming 
an old tunc. Very likely he was fond of music, and they would spend some 
pleasant evenings together, playing and singing. Her little sister came into the 
room and she seized the opportunity to ply her with numberless questions concern- 
ing the minister, but gained little information, except that he was jileasant to 
children. , 

Presently the suppor-l)oU rang, and down she went to meet her fate. As she 
went in she put on a captivating smile, which, with her many curls, surely would 
charm any reasonable man. The first view slie got of the poor, innocent minister 
showed her a middle-aged man with a hooked nose and a bald head, who greeted 
her thus : " How are you, little girl? AVhy, you remind me very much of my 
little dausihtor, about vour age." JosiE Elice Luck. 




<<.^?A 



^ 




> 



MY FRIEND'S FRIEND'S STORY. 



AFEIEND of a friend of mine gave it to my friend, and, being a friend of 
mine, my friend gave it to me. I give it to you as it was handed to me. 
You can take it for what it is worth. The written stateraant of my friend's 
friend said : 

" On the second night of February — and it was a bitterly cold night — I was 
on the Xorfolk and Western train headed west. At midniglit we passed a small 
town called Farnivillc. I had heard tiiat there was a State institution for young 
women in this place. As the train slowed up, I looked out of the car window 
and observed a tall man with a girl. He put her on the train in the seat in front 
of me, wished her success in her new field, and went out. But not before 1 had 
noticed that he was nice looking, and his hair was dark, with a few gray hairs in 
it. The girl settled herself for a nap, and I did the same. Everyone else on the 
car was already asleep. I dozed for a time. I suppose an hour had passed 
when I awoke to find some one talking in a slow, monotonous tone. It was the 
girl in front of me. She had turned in her seat, so that she looked at me. AVhen 
I first heard her, she Avas saying : 

" ' Yes, I went there ; as I told you before, it was hard to leave home. I 
did it ; yes, I did.' I wondered what had happened to her and where she had 
been. Then I remembered ; she had gotten on at Farmville, it ■was the second of 
February, the dark-haired man had Avished her success in her new field. She was 

73 



a graduate from the ' School in Farniville.' She was telling me she had been 
there, talking in her sleep. Here her voice broke in on my thoughts. 

" ' Yes, I went there ; yes, I did. I got there, you know, and I was home- 
sick ; yes, I was homesick, and I cried all night. I cried ; I really did cry. In 
the morning a bell rang before it was light, and my room-mate came over and 
shook me and said I must get up. I got up ; yes, I did. After a time another 
bell rang, and later on another. The last one was the breakfast bell, and my 
room-mate led the way to the dining-room. It was large, and full of girls, and 
the}' all looked at me. I heard some one say, 'That new girl is right nice-looking.' 
She really said so. A girl on mj' left said, ' The new girl is nice-looking. I reckon 
the K. D.'s or the Zeta Tan's will get her.' I wondered who the ' Zeta Tau's' 
and ' K. D.'s ' might be. Then a lady came in and went to a bell — no, a table, 
and tapped a bell, asked the blessing of God, tapped a bell, and sat down. I did 
likewise ; I really did.' 

" 'After breakftist the girls all rushed headlong into a large room called the 
'Assembly Hall.' There a white-haired lady came in and ' called the mail,' tap- 
ping a bell whenever anyone spoke. I didn't get a letter, and cried. A girl came 
up, spoke to me, and was so kind that I began to like her. Another one came 
up, and was introduced. ' The K. D.'s and Zeta Tau's are rushing her,' I heard 
some one say. So, were these ' K. D.'s' and 'Zeta Tau's"?' I liked them.' 

" ' See here,' and she pointed to her coat lapel. On it was a pin with ' Z. T. A.' 
on it in Greek letters. I am a ' Zeta Tan ' no\v. Well, that day I showed m}^ 
certificates, matriculated and was duly installed in the dormitor3^ The next day 
I went to class, was charged with books, told to be prepared on to-morrow's 
lessons, and was excused. I was coniident and composed. I worked on ray les- 
sons during study hours, and went to bed when the bell rang — the whole school 
seemed to be run by bells.' 

" 'When I went to class in the morning, the Math, teacher was kind. I got 
on all right in the English class, the main reason being that I was not called on 
to answer any questions. Then, too, I had my introduction to Chemistry. I 
thought I would like it. I hadn't smelled H, S then. Did you ever smell Hj S? 
I have. I hadn't had H, O explode then, either. Did you ever see H, O 
explode"? I did. 

" ' That week I got along very Avell. The next INIonday morning I went 
down to class feeling as conceited as, — well, I hardly know what to say. To me 
it was a day of many trials. Yes, it was. The teacher of Math, as good as told 
me I had no sense. We had had a letter to Avrite for the English teacher. I 
signed mine ' Lizzie.' She told me that ' Lizzie ' was not my name. I am called 
' Elizabeth ' now. So, through the whole month everything went wrong. At the 

74 



end of the montli 1 got ' X. P.' on ^latli., Entilisli, ami Ciicniistiy. Music and 
Drawing did not count for mucli, so I got ' P.' on them. At the end of the term, 
on ' Pitching Day,' my ticket had on it : 

'Bradford, Elizabelli. 
Promoted.' 

I sent it liome ; I really did. 

" ' The next terms tlie work was harder, but T managed to get through, 
though Physics nearly kept me back. When I got to the Junior B ckiss, I found 
a new one awaiting me, the Junior A. The English was enjoyable, but I had 
forgotten what a paragraph was, and accordingly felt badly about the criticism on 
my long paper. The Math, was hard ; I failed on my examination at the end of 
the term. I got through ; yes, I did. I was surprised ; I really was. 

" ' I was a Junior P> after being a Junior A. The class officers were elected. 
I was not one of them. One member of the class was mad. I was not that 
member; I really was not. 1 delved in Trig, in the Junior B. Light and Elec- 
tricity hurt my feelings. They refused to be understood. In June I got through 
by the skin of my teeth. Have your teeth skin on them "? ^line have. It has 
grown back since that June. 

" 'September followed the holiday months, as it always has done and always will 
do. I was a Junior and studied methods. AVhen the examinations came, I knew 
no methods. I had known all these once ; I I'eally liad. I took the Junior Class 
over again, so as to be quite thorough, you know. When June came, I got through. 
I was through ; I really was. I don't say I know methods, no, I don't. 

"' September again followed the holidays. I told you it always did. I can 
draw a conclusion from two instances; yes, I can. The Senior Class followed the 
Junior, as it always has done and always, most probably, will. I taught the Practice 
School children. They were bad ; they really were. They had not one redeem- 
ing quality ; no, they didn't. To one grade I tried to present the word 'you.' I 
wrote it on the board and tried ever}' way I knew to make them say it. Finally, 
I gently tapped mj- chest and said, ' What's this "? ' ' Stomach ! ' shouted one. 
That was the last class. I have my diploma in my trunk. It's all over; yes, it's 
all over.' 

" She turned around and settled down in her seat again." 

" Judge." 



A SENIOR'S REFLECTIONS. 



Backward, turn backward, O Time, in your flight. 
Make me a Normalite, just for to-night; 
Let me go bade to tlie old school hall. 
Let me again respond to each call. 
Whether to class-i-oom, to chapel, to dine — 
Let the old life again be mine. 

Backward, turn backward, O Time, in j'our flight, 

Make me a Normalite, just for to-night, 

O just for to-night, 'tis all I ask. 

Give me again my old school task, 

Joy and sorrow — cloud, sunshine — 

Let the old life again be mine. 

Backward, turn backward, O Time, in your fiiglit, 

Make me a Normalite, just for to-night. 

Fain would I wander o'er campus green. 

Fain would I live o'er many a scene; 

In morning hour or day's decline — 

IjCt tlie old life again be mine. 



A DOUBTFUL MAXIM, 



" LiSBETH, for tlie sake of common sense, close that window, oi* you know I 
will surely take cold. Here it is January, and you don't know how silly it 
looks to see you leaning out of the window. With the train going at this rate tlie 
wind is simply fearful. Dear me ! Will you never stop such absurdities?" 

Almost any traveler dozing over liis magazine would probably have found 
close observation of two girls near the middle of the car amusing, to say the least, 
if not highly interesting. 

Thus it was at first with aimless curiosity that my gaze wandered in tlie 
direction of their seat. A first glance left on my mind the impression that a 
difference of at least six or seven years existed in their ages ; a more apt student 
of human nature, however, would readily have evolved the truth of the matter, 
viz., that the troubled look on the face of the one was not the consequence of 
years, but of a peculiar temperament, resulting, no doubt, from the surroundings 
in which Fate had seen fit to place her. The nervous movement of her thin hand 
told its own tale, and the intermittent gleam of an almost black eye betrayed the 
underlying spirit. A feeling of restfulness infused my soul when, after a fixed 
gaze at this woman, I naturally turned to her younger sister (as I then supposed, 
and afterwards found to be true). The most striking thing in the face of the girl 
who had received the reprimand concerning her senselessness so calmly was a look 
of intense sympathy. But methought it was not this that compelled my gaze. I 
looked again. Yes, there it was, as I had suspected — humor ; or, to use a more 
applicable term, fun, beaming in every line of her countenance, peeping from 
between eveiy eyelash — even contriving to make this one of the most rarely 
attractive faces I had ever seen. Instantly my imagination set to work its utmost 
faculties, and, believe me, in less than a quarter of an hour I had clearly mapped 
out in mj' mind a partial biography of my little maiden. A certain independent, 
self-possessed manner of hers struck me forcibly, and a blue and white battle-axe 
pin on the sleeve of her coat verified my suspicion that she was a Normal girl. 

Her austere sister, no doubt having been in delicate health since childhood, 
had relapsed into a chronic state of be-careful-when-I'm-around, and now, as it 
were, soured against tlie world at large, it was perfectly natural for licr to remon- 
strate at the slightest thing which, though affording others a bit of pleasure, did 
not exactly fit her standard of pi'opriety. 

Now my mind strove to connect the links forged by the powers of imagina- 
tion with those presented as facts. The first scene reproduced by this series of 
retrograde wanderings was the one enacted at Lynchburg, then about fifty miles 
back up the road. It all came back forcibly. As the conductor automatically 
yelled "All aboard," these two girls had stepped on the train there, the younger 
taking the seat next the window. "With gathered speed the train was dashing- 
ahead, when I, absently gazing at the proud peaks of old Virginia, noticed, a few 
seats ahead of me, a pair of glistening eyes peering intently out of the window in 
the direction of the town we had just left. I, too, reverted my gaze that \vay, 



but could only distinguish at the station a knot of people, one rather apart from 
the others waving vigorously. 'Now I had it all straight. Lisbeth, as I had heard 
her called, having spent her X mas holidays at home, was returning to resume the 
tasks of school life. The elder girl was clearlj- acting as chaperon. 

The windo\v was lowered and peace reigned in the seat occupied by the two 
sisters. Excluding outside noises, the car was quiet, and, save the occasional 
advent of the newsboy, nothing happened to interrupt the even tenor of one's 
thoughts. 

As if struck simultaneously with a desire for ciiange of position, if nothing 
more, a well dressed lad in the front of the car turns to review the rows of faces 
behind him just as a girl three seats to the rear on the opposite side raises her 
head from a paper and gives a modest laugh. Their eyes meet, and the look of 
pleasure in his is encouraged by her lingering smile, for what harm could possibly 
come of an innocent flirtation when one's chaperon is asleep ? 

Sudden voluntary contractions of the stranger's ocular muscles convinced me 
that the stimulus of encouragement had not been cast aside. Conceiving the pos- 
sibility of having to make room for some fellow-traveller at the next station (?), 
and at the same time i-ealizing the importance of quick action, he adroitly places 
on the arm of the seat his small telescope, from the handle of which dangles a 
card bearing the words : 

' ' Leon Brandox, 

Universily of Virginia." 

A look somewhat akin to wonderment comes into the girl's face, and without 
hesitation the graceful little figure, having skilfully effected its escape from the 
seat, leaving her sister in a state of sonorous bliss, advances to the water-spigot. 
As the cup is lowered to its former position, an observer about two yards distant 
did not fail to notice a card daringly, but cunningly, slipped under it. He, need- 
less to say, was the next whose thirst became unendurable. 

"Elizabeth Beandon, 
Va." 

Where, where had he heard the name? Hadn't his father often spoken of a 
brother in Virginia ? Undoubtedly, and it was partly for this reason he now 
guessed that, by much persuasion, he had been induced to take a college course in 
the mother State, thousands of miles from home. Yes, and he remembered, too, 
Avith what special pleasure the name of a certain little first cousin whom he had 
long wanted to see (" 'Lisbeth," he thought she was called,) was always mentioned. 

"Farmville !" reverberated through the car, and as the familiar towers and 
steeples of that interesting and well-known town came into view, Miss Brandon, 
the elder (to her ntter disgust, be it said,) was roused by a sudden little shake 
inflicted by her sympathetic, yet thoughtless, sister, and, in the midst of complaints 
of the nervous shock she had sustained, was forced into an introduction to her 
Florida relative. 

She never knew how it happened, but I'm sure, from what I saw of the lady, 
that when the mystery is disclosed she will not agree with her sister in thinking 
all's well that ends well. " M. K. E. 




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/>:f, PERIODICALS FOUND IN OUR 
iM i READING-ROOM. 

I » DAILIES. 

I The Xm-folk Lamlmark. 




The Literary Digest. 
Public Opinion. 
Nature. 
The Outlook. 

The New 



WEEKLIES. 

The Path-finder. 
The Nation. 
The Christian Observer. 
The Youth's Companion. 
I'jigland Journal of Education. 



Our Times 



SEMI-MONTHLIES. 

The Louisville Courier-.Journal. 



MONTHLIES. 



Tbe Forum. 

Scribner's Magazine. 

Harper's Magazine. 

The Century Magazine. 

The Ladies' Home Journal. 

Woman's Home Companion. 

The Popular Science Monthly. 

The Perry Magazine. 

The Contemporary Eeview. 

The Primary School. 

The Journal of School Physiology. 

School and Home Education. 

The Educational Review. 



Tile Teachers' Review. 

The .Journal of School Geography. 

The Review of Reviews 

The Intercollegian. 

The Evangel. 

The Virginia School Journal. 

Current Events. 

Art Education. 

Educational Foundation. 

The Students' Journal. 

The Atlantic Monthly. 

Germ an ia. 

La Francaise. 



QUARTERLIES. 
The American Historical Review. Current History. 




■i o 




Hlpba Chapter of Sioma %io>um Sioma 
jFraternit^. 



Colors : Moss Green and Violet Purple. 
Motto : Pistos achri thanaton. 



Skull and cross bones, rah I rah I rah ! 
Sigma, Sigma, Sigma, ha I ha ! ha ! 
Death and destruction to things that are wrong : 
Strength and protection, we are the strong ! 
Skull and cross bones, rah ! rah ! rah ! 
Sigma, Sigma, Sigma, ha ! ha ! ha ! 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO. 



Sadie Browning Armstrong. 
LotTisE Davis. 
Lucy Dix Eglix. 
Harriet Parker Hankixs. 
Jexxie C. M. Jacksox. 



Natalie Laxcaster. 
Mamie Kichardsox. 
Rhea Clarke Scott. 
LrcY T. C. Stcbbs. 
Xaxxie H. Wright. 



SORORES EX COLLEGIO. 



Mary Laird Leasox. 
Ellen Thom Richardsox. 
Lelia Agxes Scott. 
Lucy Elizabeth Wright. 



Luc Y Daxiel Thorxtox. 
Sallie Jacksox Michie. 
Martha Trent Featherston. 
Margaret Lee Battex. 



IsABELLE Noyce Merrick. 
83 




ESTABLISHED 1898. 



Hlpba Chaptev of Zeta ^au Hlpba 
jFratevnit^. 



Flower : White Violet. 
Colors : Turquoise Blue and Steel Gray. 

IN URBE. 

Nettie Duxxington Mortox. 



IN COLLEGIO. 



Helex May Crafford 
Jessie Evers Whitmore 
Mary Emma Magruder 
Mary Cajipbell Joxes 
Mary Power Farthixg 
Alice Maud Joxes 



JOSEPHIXE NaRCISSA GoODWIX 

Grace Estelle Elcax 
Anna Bruce Houston 
Frances Yaxcey Smith 
Mary Elizabeth Adajis 
Edith Merriweather Lawrence 



Hlpba Cbaptcr of Ikappa IDelta jFvatevnlt^. 



Organized in the State Female Normal School, 
Farmville, Va., October 15, 1896. 



Colors : Olive Green and Silver Gray. 
Flower : Maro-uerite Daisv. 



Zi])|)iia, lioomera, 
B()(im-a-laelu zelta ! 
Zijipna hooniera, 
Alpha Ka]ipa Delta ! 

MEMBERS : 
Hallie Easley Owen Mary Virginia Hopkins 

Mary Booker Daniel Anna Trent Page 

Margaret Watkins Goode Lucile Virginia Kent 
Portia Lee Owen *Mary Somerville Sparke 

Carrie Sturdivant Goode *Geneyieve Bacon Venable, in urbe 
Delia Griffin Jones Charlotte McKinney, in urbe 

Mary Magill Gilkeson Mary Jackson, in urbe 

Alice Atkinson 



Absent wlien picture was taken. 



®ut ffraterntt^ (3irl8. 




CAMMIE JONES 
MAUD JONES 




MADGE GOODE 
MARY DANIEL 
HALLIE OWEN 
PORTIA OWEN 




ANNA BRUCE HOUSTON 




NATALIE LANCASTER 




LUCY STUBBS 
EMMA MAGRDDER 
GRACE ELCAN 





NATALIE LANCASTER 
NANNIE WRIGHT 
RHEA SCOTT 
JULIA CHILTON 
LAURA CHILTON 
SUSIE SCOTT 



LOUISE DAVIS 




Organized in ISiKI. ( )Hiecrs elected every January. 

OBJECT : 

Tlie development of Cliristian eliaraeter in its members, and the prosecution 

of active Christian work, particularly among the young women of our institution. 

OFFICERS, 1900-1901 : 

FRANCES YANCEY SMITH. 1901, President. 

BESSIE ROSSER CARPER, 1901, Vice-President. 

.JOSEl'IIINK El. let: U'CK. I'.inl, ■|'iv;isiii-er. 

ELIZAIiKTlI (IKKTlMIiK I'l I-IK !•:, I'.KU, Recording Secretary. 

MEKCV .\1AR<;AHET CKI.M, I'.inl, Convsiionding Secretary. 

STANDING COMMITTEES: 

Df.vott.ixai,— I.fLA ANDREWS, Cli.iirnian. 
I'.ir.i.i: Sii i.Y— Miis. ]'. L, MoHRISOX, Cliaimian. 
Mi--ioN>— NAXXIE KOYAI.L, ChairiiKin. 

I'i.NANcE— Josephine e. luck, ciiairman. 

IxTEKCOLLE(il.\TF. RELATIONS — MEltCA' CKI.M, Cliaimian. 
RoOJl AND Library— S.-iR.4H H(J(;(i, (_ liairiiian. 
Mu-sio— MAMIE GROSSCLOSE, Chairman. 
Me.mbership— LUCY' STUBBS, Chairman. 
Social— Mrs. MORRISON, Chairman. 

A very prominent factor of our school life is the Young Woman's Christian 
Association. Statistics of the work would fail to give its remarkable growth. We 
now have enrolled one hundred and twenty-six members. The large majority of 
these are active members. The interest manifested this year has been far more 
general than ever before. 

Delegates to Conventions — Summer School, Asheville, N. C, 1. 







^^jSa^^^ ^"Js*- 




TENNIS CLUB. 




tennis dlub. 



SARAH E. PRITCHETT, President. 

MAUDE JONES, Vice-President. 

GRACE E. ELCAN, . . Secretary and Treasurer. 



MEMBERS : 

MATTIE ALEXANDER MARTIN 

LULA O. ANDREWS 

LELIA JEFFERSON HARVIE 

VIRGINIA REYNOLDS 

EDNA V. MOFFETT 

S. GAY PaTTESON 

SAKAH E. PRITCHETT 

MOLLIE PHILLIPS 

LUCY DANIEL 

MARY DANIEL 

MARTHA MILLER 

OTELIA HARVIE 

ROBERTA HUNT 

EMMA KING 

VIVIAN BINNS 



ELLEN PAINTER 
LOUISE DAVIS 
NATALIE LANCASTER 
LUCY STUBBS 
HARRIET HANKINS 
ALICE ATKINSON 
PORTIA OWEN 
ELLA BURGER 
LUCILE KENT 
SADIE ARMSTRONG 
GRACE ELCAN 
MAUD JONES 
REBECCA WALKER 
LAURA CHILTON 
LIZZIE PIERCE 



95 



(3ennan Club. 



OFFICERS : 



MARY M. GILKESON, President. 

LOUISE M. DAVIS, . . Secretary and Treasurer. 



MEMBERS : 



LUCIA SCOTT 
HARRIETTE COWLES 
GEORGIE GARROW 
LOUISE EMMONS 
LIZZIE BRYAN 
GRACE ELCAN 
HELEN CRAWFORD 
EMMA KING 
NELLIE MUNDAY 
NORVELL JONES 
CHLOE LACKEY 
JESSIE WHITMORE 
MAMIE EPPES 
GRACE CHRISTIAN 
LIfCY WOOD 
MAUD JONES 
MARGARET HALE 
M. CAMPBELL JONES 
LUCY STUBRS 
NANNIE WRIGHT 
ALICE ATKINSON 

LIZZIE 



BRUCE HOUSTON 
MARY ADAMS 
EDITH LAWRENCE 
LELIA JONES 
MARGARET GOODE 
HATTIE THOMPSON 
PORTIA OWEN 
JESSIE COX 
LOUISE HOGWOOD 
LAURA CHILTON 
LUCILE KENT 
MARY COLEMAN 
ELLEN PAINTER 
MAMIE GROSSCLOSE 
MAGGIE SIBLEY 
SALLY LEACIIE 
MARY DANIEL 
LIZZIE PINNER 
MOLLIE PHILLIPS 
NELLIE WALKER 
ANNA PAGE 
HALL 







Organized December, 1899. 



OFFICERS : 

A. BRUCE HOUSTON, President, Lexington, Va. 
JESSIE E. WHITMORE, Vice-President. 

DALIA LAM Secretary. 

NORVELL JONES, . . . Treasurer, Brownsburg, Va. 
MARY BUCHANAN, . Historian, Brownsburg, Va. 

MEMBERS : 

DALLA. L.A.M A. BRUCE HOUSTON NORVELL JONES 

JESSIE E. WHITMORE MAEY BUCHANAN 




^^"y'^^^y^\Yj'!i]h 



in 



Motto: "Eat, drink, and be merry, for to-niorrow you finnk." 
Favorite Food : Corn bread and sweet potatoes. 
Song : " O, dat watermelon ! 

Dat's de land de people tell on !" 
Favorite Vegetable : "Beef." 
Favorite Beverage : A¥ater, of conrse. 
Favorite Amusement : Laying and lying. 
C01-1OR.S : Watermelon-pink and corn-yellow. 

OFFICERS : 
HALLIE (_)\VEN, Cliief Cook and Bottle-Waslier. 
PORTIA (JVVEN, Grand Lord Higli Pie-Taster. 
MARY COLEMAN, Chief Cat-Catcher for the Hash Department. 

MEMBERS : 

HALLIE ()\Vi;X MARY COLEMAN 

PORTIA OWEX 

HONORARY MEMBER: 

Mrs. M(.)RRIS0N 
100 




OFFICERS : 

MERCY CRIM, . President. 

MABEL FURR, . Vice-President. 

MARY ADAMS, Secretary and Treasurer. 



Motto : " Six of one and half a dozen of the other." 

Favorite Pa.stime : Looking for property somebody has borrowed. 

Require>[ENts foe Admission : Must be from Loudoun county. Must have the 
intelligence (?) and ability to s])eak on all subjects. 

Song : 

How dear to our hearts are the scenes of old Loudoun, 

When often in fancy far northward we roam ; 
We see the loved hills, and, with hearts beating faster, 

We echo together, "My own native home." 



MEMBERS : 



MARY ADAi\iS 
MABEL FURR 
ELL.i HAUPT 



MERCY CRIM 
Miss HAYXES 
RUTH PRICE 




pulasl^i Club. 



CofNTERSlfiN : "Say, do vou think we will (jet to go? 
Colors : Old Gold and White. 
Oi'ExiNG Ode : "A Test To-day." 
Floaver : Goldenrod. 
Song: "Take Me Home." 



OFFICERS : 

ELLEN GILMER PAINTER, President. 

MARGARET MOREHEAD, . Vice-President. 

SALLY "WILLBTT LEACHE, Secretary. 



MEMBERS : 
Ordinary, E.xtraordinar_y and Honorary. 



ELLEX P.\IN'TER 
LIZZIE H.iLL 
SALLIE LEACIIE 
MARGARET MOREHEAD 



Ivor A ALLISOX 
LELIA CIIUMBLEY 
KV\.\ HOWARD 
lli.V IloW.MH) 



MATTIE ALEXANDER M.\1!T1X 
Closing Ode : "And the Lisfhts Went Ont.' 




Seasibc Club. 



Unifoem : AMiite caps and blue robes. 

Song: "Sailing, Sailing, Over the Boundless Main.' 

JMoTT(.) : "Learn the secret of tlie sea? 

Only those who brave its dangers 
Comprehend its mystery." 



"WAVES : 



NORMA CLEMENTS, Largest Wave. 
LUCY STUBES, Prettiest Wave. 
ELIZABETH WATKIXS, Daintiest Wave. 
HARRIET HAN KIN'S, Longest Wave. 
EVA HALL, Ydunuest ^Vave. 
(ip:()K(iIE (iAKKOW, Luidcst Wave. 
ELIZABETH (TLrEPEK, Cnl.lest Wave. 
LUCY STEl!LL\(i, Bn)a.lest Wave. 



LIZZIE BRYAN, Smallest Wave. 
PEARL REAPER, Oddest Wave. 
GEORGIA .1AM KS, ('almrst Wave. 
MARY BrilCllKH, Sl„,rlr.l Wave. 
NANNIE WRIliHT, Karkcsl Wave. 
MOLLIE I'lllLLH'S, Dc.'ihsI Wave. 
CIII.OE LACKEY, Wannest Wave. 
CATHARINE PARKER, Slowest Wave. 



SARAH HOGG and EMMA BARNES, Sister Waves. 
JULIA and LAIIRA CHILTON, Twin Waves. 



OTHER "WAVES : 



ELIZABETH PIERCE 
JNIINTA WYNNE 
.1 ESS IE (DX 
SALLIE MORRISON 
ANNIE WHITEHEAD 
BEKTIE AMOKY 
VIVIAN BINNS 
MARTHA MARSH 
MAMIE RICHARDSON 



MAG(!IE SIBLEY 
MARY FARTHING 
LI DIE MILLER 
MARY SIIACKLEFORD 
ANGIE POWELL 
ELIZABETH PINNER 
HELEN CRAEEORD 
EDITH DIDLAKE 
HELOISE PERCIVAL 




Zhc **Eat-'Em*lIlp8." 



CoLOES : Pickle Green and Ham Red. 



Hip, ri]), zip, zap ; 
We are the girls to " eat 'em up." 

The lights are out on every hall, 
And all have answered "Aunt Portia's" call 
Of "All in bed ?" and by that you know 
That little lady has gone below. 

The rats have begun their cannonading, 
And over our heads are now parading. 
When, hush ! there's a whistle, a low, sweet call, 
And eight little figures are seen on the hall. 



With noiseless tread they all ascend 
To their leader's roona, in the eastern end. 
And what takes place — well, you shall know 
By the following words that are here below. 

They enter the little room, one after one ; 
Then, opening the bags, the fun is begun ; 
There are pickles and eggs and crackers galore, 
And the very best olives from some distant shore. 

The girls are seated merrily around m a ring, 
And for pickles and olives are not doing a tiling ; 
There is Grace, our dear leader, she sits on the rug 
For such as the bare floor she is aliove. 
105 



Whenever we wish it, our wee liands she fills, 
But she is always boring us with something about " (i ills." 
Then all is going merrily when, up from the floor, 
There comes a small voice saying "I want some more." 

That's Portia, I know — or rather, I guess — 
For she eats ravishingly since she went to H. S. 
You see, she was struck there b}' Cupid 's wild dart, 
But I think that, somehow, she still has a heart. 

'Pliert' is Alice, called Sin, who loves to pick bones. 
But I think it best suited to call her our "Jones ;" 
She sits by the door and a ready ear lends 
To hear if Mrs. Morrison the stairs should ascend. 

We bad almost forgotten — and we own it with shame — 
To mention Hallie, our barometer, who knows all aljout " K; 
She reads all the almanacs, and, from \diat I can gather. 
Had rather have rain than any other weather. 

If apples you say, there is only about two ; 

But what does that matter to us merry few ? 

For Liz. has a Gard(e)ner, whom she thinks is just " dear.'' 

So, with him on the list, what need we fear. 

The pickles turned over, and oh, what a bub-lug ! 
You might know it was caused by Lucile, our kissing-bug. 
Then there is Carrie and Jennie, who are jumping about. 
With ever a fear of being found out. 

They are quiet and good, and Mrs. Morrison adore ; 

I believe if .she'd sit on them they'd go through the floor ; 

Tliey eat and they jump, and before yon can say 

"Scat my ! " in a jitfy they have scampered away. 

These are the girls that have the fine sups. 

And are known over school as the gay " Eat 'Em Ups," 

In numbers, as mentioned, there' s onlj' us eight. 

But I am sure you would tliink us all very sedate. 

We eat and we chatter till the first thing we know 
There is actually "Aunt Portia" opening the door. 
For Alice, the Sin(ner), was just cramming cake, 
And a thought of Mrs. Morrison did not even take. 

With a bustle and hustle we hurry away. 
Thinking .sadly of the sitting-on we'll get the next day. 
But what do we care for these breaks in our sups, 
For we are still heroic and gay "Eat 'Em Ups." 




g?^#^^^t?5'"»'«- 



I INIIATCHED millions cry for vengeance- 
Cry aloud, both day and night, 
Till the world is filled with weeping 
For the crime that "might is right." 

You have slain them without caring — 
Murdered in your thoughtless way, 

E'en before their life's beginning — 
Ere they'd seen the light of day. 

Does your conscience never pain you ? 

Does your mind still rest in peace? 
Does your heart remain unsoftened? 

Will the horrors never cease? 



Go on with your cruel workings 
Till you've tasted sorrow's dregs; 

Go on with your midnight revels — 
Still continue eating eggs ! 



E. L. J. M. 




^ea Club. 



YELL; 

One a zip, two a zip, 

/ippie, zippie, zee ; 

Eali, rah, zip ! 

Rah, rah, ree ! 

AA'iiat ai-e we, what are we? 

^\eh•e the T, the T, the T. 

MEMBERS : 

NATALIE LANCASTER MARGAEET GOODE 

MARY ADAMS LOUISE DAVIS 

MARYGILKERSON EMMA MAGRUDER 

NANNIE WRIGHT 



108 




Ibu^lev =Xovvne^ Club. 



COLOKS : I'lirpk' and Lavemlfr. 

YELL: 

H. L. C. ! H. L. C. ! 

Huyler's, Lowiiey's. 
Rah ! Eah ! Re ! 

Object OF Organization : Tliat members miiilit kiKiwcaeli otlier better (until 
. after Xmas, at any rate.) 

Pi^ACB OF Meeting : In left-hand eorner room of Professional Hall. 

OFFICERS : 

VIVIAN BINNS, . . Chief of Commissary Department. 
LOUISE DAVIS, . . Box-opener. 
MARY GILKESON, Sampler. 

[Tliis is only permissible after a license fee of five dollars lias been paid.] 

MEMBERS : 
LUCYSTUBBS MAMIE KICHARDSON 

HAKRIET HANKINS LUCY EGLIN 



HONORARY : 
ELIZABETH WATKINS SAKAH SPENCER (Junior) 




Colors : Red and Blue. 



Motto : It's just between ourselves. 



Red and blue. 
Hobo! Who? 
We are the girls 
Of Me and U. 

MEMBERS : 



NATALIE LANCASTER, 


. R. P. A. P. 


MAKGARET GOODE, . . 


. A. C. S. 


SADIE ARMSTRONG, . . 


. M. R. B. 


CARRIE GOODE, 


. B. T. C. 


LUCY WOOD, 


. T. R. B. 


LUCIA SCOTT, 


. P. P. B. 




EMMA KING-, President. 

LUCY STUBBS, .... Vice-President. 
SADIE APv,MSTRONG, Treasurer. 



Colors ; Black and Blue. 



Motto : " Together, we stand ; divided, we fall. 



Thiuiip, dump, 
Humpity, hood ; 
Now \\'e are ready 
For Paulette's pond. 



MEMBERS : 



LUCY STUBBS 
MARGAKET GOODE 
SADIE ARMSTRONG 
EMMA KING 
HARRIET HANKINS 
LUCY EGLIN 



MARY ADAMS 
ALICE ATKINSON 
NORVEL JONES 
MARY DENNY 
MAMIE GROSSCLOSE 
BERTA HUNT 




THE fdllowing statistics were carefully com])ilod from the actual number of 
votes handed in, and therefore, if any girl thinks she has been unfairly 
treated in not being- recorded the handsomest or cleverest girl, she can only 
blame her friends for not being able to appreciate her : 

Elizabeth Watkins, by a large majority, was decided upon as the Pret- 
tiest Girl. 

Maey Shack lef( USD was thought by most of the girls to be the AVittiest Girl. 

Sallie Morris was honored by a large majority as the Best Dancer. 

Eor the Most Popular Girl, Grace Elcan received by far the greatest 
number of votes. 

Lizzie Cuepeper was almost unanimously chosen as the Cleverest Girl. 

From the scattering votes for the Biggest Flirt, one would think the Normal 
girls did nothing but flirt; however, Cammie Jones came out with a clear majority. 

Elizabeth Watkins comes in for another honor as the Faculty's Darling. 

Mary Daniel is considered by her friends to be the Handsomest Girl. 

Bruce Houston was conceded by popular sentiment to be our BestTalkei'. 

Sarah Hogg was voted the Most Graceful Walker. 

Fannie Smith, by an almost unanimous vote, was chosen the Best Girl. 

As the Cutest Girl, Vivian Binns came out with flyiug colors. 

Margaret Hale heads the list, out of many candidates, as the Hardest Student. 

The honor of being the Most Learned Girl is divided between Janie 
Whealton and Mary Coleman. 

For the Most Dignified Girl, the vote for Isauelle Hutchinson was nearly 
unanimous. 

Lucia Scott and Alice Atkinson were found to be the Jolliest Girls. 

None could l)e more deserving than Chloe Lackey of the title of Most 
Sentimental. 

Maude Jones M'as well chosen as the Girl We All Lo\e. 

The average age of the Normal girl is eighteen years ; the average height, 
five feet four inches ; average weight, one hundred and nineteen pounds. 

Their dispositions range from vile to excellent. 

Eighty per cent, claim to dance; twenty per cent, are engaged; uiucty-fivc 
per cent, are in love ; only three per cent, fiirt (quite a model set), and ninety-nine 
and seven-eighths per cent, expect to get married. 



^o i. 



^ 



'^■«, ^t-8,^ ^^C\ 




S'&u'oL aaX>a, yV.a.-l<vi: -k/cc-C^ 'XXju tvuZn^hMZt 



Uvi>v d. Aa/ 0-mJ ^A,X\XaX •A>i /v^i Ab,-(lT , 



IIG 



QUIPS AND CRANKS. 



Miss H. (wishing t(i sciid :i telegram): "Now, Mr. Cox, please send this 
telegram right ott', as I want it to go by the twelve o'elock train." 



Miss C. : "Jnst look at those tnrkeys in that tree! I never knew before 
that turkeys roosted so high." 

Miss A. : " Those are turkey-buzzards, my dear." 

Miss RfA'NOLDS : "Miss Tj., will yon jilease explain why the Arctie regions 
are called ' polar regions '.' ' " 

Miss L. : "Because so many ])olar liears li\-e up there." 

Miss 1'. (looking up from her reading) : "Please tell mc what an automo- 
bile is." 

Miss H. : "A horseless carriage." 

Miss 1\ : "A horseless carriage ! Dear mc ! Does it have shafts ? " 

Miss Y. (meeting a friend on the street) : " Can you tell me where I can fin<l 
a shoe-shop? I have been looking all over town for one." 

Miss H. : "Across the street, there, next to Hunt's." 

Miss Y. : " I am so glad I have found one. I went in that place next door, 
but there was a man being shaved in there ; so I guess it was a liarbcr-shop." 

Miss D. (in great excitement) : " () Hattie, who is that note for "? " 

Hattie (the maid) : " For the Z. T. A. sowiety." 

Miss D. : " Where does she i-oom ? I never heard of her." 

Miss Reynolds (in Hygiene class) : "Miss P., will you bring nie the skele- 
ton from the next room ? " 

Miss P. (after several minutes' search) : " Miss Reynolds, T don't see any- 
thing but a pile of bones." 

Miss R. (the Geography teacher) : " Miss h., will you name the ehicf educa- 
tional institutions of Virginia ? " 

Miss L. : "The Normal School, Harvard University, and the Staunton 
Lunatic Asylum." 

117 








4/ih^X ?}i/d 











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7]^ >OlMd. 






School Sono. 




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School Soiuj. 



As a slndent body we're specially fine, 

Hurrah! Harroo ! Hurray! 
For our good home cooking we never pine, 
And we march thro' tlie lialls in a verv straight line 

Ilnrrah ! Ilari-oo ! Ilurrav ! 



All our pennies we lioard from eve till morn, 

Hnrrali ! Ilarroo ! Ilnrray ! 
For candy and peannts we're very forlorn, 
But our room with pictures we leill. adorn, 

Ilni'rah ! Harroo ! Hnrray ! 

We're sober, serious, studious girls ! 

Hurrah ! Harroo ! Hnrray ! 
Onr president says we're "jewels, pearls, 
Orderly, neat, obedient girls," 

Ilnriah ! Han-oo ! Hnrj-ay ! 

Our studies are hard you'll not deny that, 

Hurrah ! Harroo ! Hurray ! 
They work off our flesh and don't make us fat, 
And oft recitations are decidedly flat, 

Hurrah ! Harroo ! Hurray ! 



The time is approaching when we'll have to leave. 

Hurrah ! Harroo ! Hurray ! 
But I'm sure to the dear old Normal we'll cleave, 
And many a long-drawn sigh we'll lieave, 

Hurrali ! Harroo ! Huirav ! 



Horntal School 



Tune: "Eli Yale." 

Tlie first year at the Normal Sclioot, 
Fol de rol, de rol rol rol, 

We feel nnicli like a bliiiiteil Innl, 
Fol (le rol de rol rol rol. 

Chorus : 

Normal, Normal, Normal School, 
Fol de rol, de rol rol rol ; 

Normal, Normal, Normal School, 
Fol de rol, de rol rol rol. 



The second year we wiser grow, 
Fol de rol, de rol rol rol ; 

I think our teachers will say so, 
Fol de rol, de rol rol rol. 



In .Jimior year we wonders see, 
Fol de rol, de rol rol rol. 

For then we have Trigonometry, 
Fol de rol, de rol rol rol. 



Cnor.us. 



In Senior year we lose onr heart, 

Fol de rol, de rol rol rol. 
When asked our knowledge to impart, 

Fol de rol, de rol rol rol. 

CnoRU.s. 

Bnt, then, when we as teachers pose, 

Fol de rol, de rol rol rol, 
We must look wise and not suppose, 

Fol de rol, de rol rol rol. 

Chorus. 

And now, the saddest thing we know, 

Fol de rol, de rol rol rol, 
Is from the Normal we must go, 

Fol de rol, de rol rol rol. 

Chorus. 

And in the world as teachers fried, 

Fol de rol, de rol rol rol. 
We feel we are Virginia's pride, 

Fol de rol, de rol rol rol. 

Chorus. 



Kebecca Jane Whealtom. 



XTbe Blue anb Mbite. 



Students of the Normal School are we, 
And we are as good as good can be ; 
Never a rule by us is bi'oken, 
Ne'er a cross word by us is spoken. 
We eat beef, hash, molasses and beans, 
With the greatest relish and no bad scenes. 

CnoRUS. 
I.o, hurrah for the blue and white ! 
We sing with hearts both happy and light. 
W^e'll remember by daj' and night 
The Normal, the blue and the white. 

Lessons and tests we have galore, 

English, Physics and many more. 

The singing and drawing we do 

Is almost enough to frighten you. 

But still we'll always be true 

To the Normal, the white and tlie Iilue. 



Lucy Stubbs. 



f5cbool Sono. 



I am a little Normal light so gay, gay, gny, 

I love to come to school, but to only play, play, piny, 

I dearly love mj' teachers kind, l<ind, kind, kind, 

But when I do not know my lessons I get boliiml, liind, liind, liiiid. 

School, school, why 1 love to go, go, go, gn, 
And get on with the teachers, so, so, so. 

< In Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday I get late for class, class, cla 
(.)n Friday I try to redeem myself in order to pass, pass, pass. 
But next week in the same habits I grow, grow, grow, 
And onward through the term I go, go, go. 

I send my math, a flying, flying, flying, flying. 
And oflF I go a crying, crying, crying, crying 
jind then 1 get my Latin, tin, tin, tin, 
And read it oft' as fast as the wind, :rin,i, viml. 



Lillian Aurelia Keister. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



Miss G. A. Y. : — The best time to prepare for bed is after the lights are out, 
and after you ha\'e paid several visits. Come home when you hear Miss Sarah or 
Mrs. Morrison coming; then jump in bed with your shoes and clotiics on, or you 
can begin to say your prayers. 

Miss F. L. I. P. : — Never Ituy more than one article each time you go down 
town. By following tiiis rule you will always have a reason for asking to go 
down the street. 

Miss Green : — It is at all times extremely bad taste to ask to go down town 
if you can by any means slij) out of the back Vfay without being caught. 

Miss F. : — I should Ijy all means mail my letters at the postoffice if possible, 
even if the office is out of your way and you pass by a dozen letter-boxes on your 
way down. The reason for this is obvious : Mrs. Morrison does not allow the 
girls to go to the office. 

Miss B. : — Never use your own cnal as long as the girls on vuur hall liaveany ; 
it is so much easier to go all the way down the hall and borrow some than to use 
your own. 

Miss E. : — In the dining-room always laugh and talk as loudly as you can 
until Mrs. Morrison has knocked seven times ; then pinch your neighbor and sub- 
side into a giggle. 

Miss L. A. T. E. : — If you are out of your room studying when Mrs. Mor- 
rison comes around, never try to get back to your own room, for in so doing you 
ai'e sure to be caught. It is safer to crawl under the bed, step behind the screen, 
or into the wardrobe. 

Miss G. A. D. : — I should not try to use more than ten reference books in 
the library at once, unless the whole class is referred to more. You can put five 
under your chair, sit on two, use one, and hold two in your lap. 




'^Cx 



Natalie Lan'caster : 

" Your face, my thane, is as a book 
AVliere men may read strange matters.' 

Lucia Scott : 

"And she would 
talked ! ' ' 



Lord, liow slie 




EuLA Howard : 

" One vast substantial smile." 

Lelia Jones : 

"Unthinking-, idle, wild and young." 

Margaret Hale : 

" My life is one deni'd horrid grind." 

Anna Page : 

" Tetchy and wayward." 

NoRVELL Jones : 
" A merrier 
I never spent an liour's talk withal." 

Eleanor Randolph : 
•r-~_,-^ " Pier mind doth contain infinite riches in a 

j ) little room." 

"^-^ Elizabeth Watkins : 

"A perfect woman, nobly planned." 

MoLLiE Phillips : 

"Faith, but thou hast some knowledge in 
thy head." 

Maude Jones : 

" Her very frowns are fairer far 
Than smiles of other maidens are." 

Mamie Kiciiardson : 

" Deep versed in books." 

Josephine Goodwin : 

"See mortals born to sleep tlieir lives away." 

126 



^^ 



Ijkuce Houston : 

" Her facu ri^lit woiulmiis fair did swm to be." 
Janik Wheai.ton : 

" VVlieiice is tliy learning? Hasl tljy toil 
O'er books consumed tiie luidniglit oil '.'" 
Bessie Wells : 

'■ Metliouglit I heard a voice say, 'Slee[i no more.' " 
Helen Ckaffoud : 

" Talkers are no good doers." 
Mary Coleman : 

"In books a prodigal, tliey say — 
A living cyclopiedia." 

Meucy Crim : 

"She'd nndertake to prove by force 
Of argument a man's a lioi-se ; 
She'd prove a buzzard is no fowl. 
And that a lord may be an owl." 

Portia Owen : 

" Lively and aye amused, 
And with a spice of wit, too." 
Madue Goode : 

" She was in logic a great critic ; 
Profounilly ^kill,,| in analytic ; 
SheciMiM .li^iinuui^h and divide 
A hair 'twixt suLiili and southwest side." 
Jennie Jack.son : 

" Mixed rea.son w-ith pleasure, and wisdom with mirth." 
Nannie Wright : 

"Her eyes' dark charm 't were vain to teU." 
Nannie Royall : 

" And long as poetry shall charm mankind 
Thy Howing numbers will admirers tind." 
Emma Magruder : 

" C'on,staut you are. 
But yet a woman ; and, for secrecy, 
No lady closer. " ' ' 

Alioe Atkinson : 

' ' Who sees a soul in such a body set 
Might love the treasure for the cabinet." 
LuciLE Kent : 

"Kissing maybe naughty, but't is nice." 
Isabelle Hutchinson : 

"My life is one long pleasant thought." 
Norjia Clements : 

" Thon art pale in mighty studies grown." 
Mary Buchanan : 

"Smooth runs the water where the brook is deep." 
Louise Davis : 

"See higli-erected thoughts, , 
All seated in the heart of courtesy." 
Lucy Daniel : 

" Eternal smiles her emptiness betray." 
Daisy Smith : 

"Solomon, in all his glory, was not arrayed like one of these." 



J-^ 



t^s^^ 



■ I 

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i 



•/e^''-- 







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^ t?:* ^?:T '^?? ^Hif *!? t?^ ^?^ t?:* *!:* ^H^ t?^ t|? '^?^ t?:^ t?? tf? ^? ^:^ '^J:^ *;?:* 54 



ITable of Contents. 



% 4^ 4;^ 4:4 4;^ 44 4;^ 4^ 4:* 44 4^ 4^ 4^ 4* 4^ 4* 4^ 4'* 4'* 4-* 4^ "^"^ 



PAGE 

Frontispiece — JNIaiii BiiiUling. 

Dedication 4 

Greeting 5 

Dr. Frazer (portrait) 6 

Eecent Progress at the Normal 7 

Calendar 8 

Pi'eface 9 

Board of Editors 10, U 

Board of Trustees I'i 

Tlie Faculty 13-15 

Domestic Department ' . . 16, 17 

The Alumnie Association IS 

Cunningham Memorial Scholarship 19 

Classes : 

February, 1900 20-27 

June, 1900 28-32 

February, 1901 34, 35 

June, 1901, and February, 1902 36, 37 

June, 1902 38, 39 

February, 1903 40, 41 

June, 1903 42, 43 

February, 1904 44-40 

Practice School 47 

Socially 48 

Bachelors' Reveries. 

Introduction 49 

My First Call at The Normal 51-54 

Ballade of a Normalite 55 

An Incident ; 56, 57 

Tlie Magi's Eose Bud 58, 59 

Prize Verses : 

Repeat 60 

The Test-Papers 61 

My Rival 62 

Among the Graduates 63, 64 

Clippings from Class : 

A Scene in the Black Belt 65-67 

Dawn 07 

Hawthorne's English 68 

Imitations of Well Known Authors . . 69 



PAGE 

Wliat Would it Be? 70 

The New Minister 71, 72 

Literary : 

My Friend's Friend's Story 73-75 

A Senior's Reflections 76 

A Doulitful Maxim 77, 78 

Poem 79 

Periodicals Found in Our Reading Room. . . 80 

Fraternities : 

Alpha Cliapter of Sigma Sigma Sigma 82, 83. 
Alpha Chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha. . . 85-87 

Alpha Chapter of Kappa Delta 88, 89 

Our Fraternity Girls 90 

Organizatioxs : 

Y. W. C. A 92 

Clubs : 

Tennis Club 94, 95 

German Club 96, 97 

Glee Club 98 

Rockbridge Club 99 

Halifax Club 100 

"We Six" 101 

Pulaski Club 102 

Seaside Club 103 

The Sea-Nymphs 104 

The " Eat-'Em-Ups" 105, 106 

Egg Club 107 

Tea Club 108 

Huyler-Lowney Club 109 

Me and U Club 110 

Skater's Club Ill 

Miscellaneous : 

Statistics 115 

Mule 116 

Quips and Cranks 117 

Experiments 118 

School Songs. 120-124 

Answers to Correspondents 125 

Grinds 126, 127 

Advertisements — Suggestions. 





u^sQsions 



c\ 




STATE FEMALE 
NORMAL SCHOOL, 



FARMVILLK, 2 s - ^ VIRGINIA. 



-I^^^ll- 



pOUNDED by the Legislature to educate teachers for the 
^ public schools. Free tuition provided by the State for 
two hundred young women. Scholarships apportioned 
among the counties and cities. 

Liberal courses in Language, Literature, History, Sciences 
and Art. 

Professional course for teachers. 

A Graded Practice School in which students receive a 
year's training before going out to teach. 

Next session begins September twentieth. 

Catalogue sent on application. 



W. C. FALLWELL, 

DEAI.Ki; IN 

Ladies', Gentlemen's and 

Children's SHOES. 

Repairing done promptly. 

Next to ( 'ourtmouse. 



H. C. CRUTE. 



Dealer in Drugs, Medicines, Chejii- 
CALS, Toilet Articles, Peufu.vehy, Ac. 



Purity and Accuracy. 



There's a little store upon the hill, 

Where "UNCLE PAT" presides; 
Apples and candy adorn the sill, 

And in-doors everything besides. 
The place to go if you've a penny, 

For you can buy five times more 
Than if you go invest in " Tenney " 

At a down-town store. 



BARROW & COWAN, 

UNDERTAKERS 
FURNITURE DEALERS. 

BIG STOCK. LOW PRICES. 

Main St., FARMVILLE, VA. 



OUR MOTTO: 



, First-Class Work, 



Farmville Steam Laundry, 

il. LiNDSEY, Proprietor. 



C. C. I'LEMINfi. 



W. T. CL.\RK. 



FLEMING & CLARK, 



Mill DE.VLERS in 



DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, 

HATS, BOOTS, SHOES. &c. 



and Zfigk'r's Shoes, Specialties. 



FARMVILLE, VA. 



NOEL BROS., 



Gener.\l Line of... 

Household Goods, Stoves, 
Tinware, Crockery, Lamps, 
Lamp Goods, &c. 

Specialties: Tin Roofing;, (^utteringaiid \^' 
Spouting, in town and countr.v. * 






AV. G. Duiiiiinglon. Walter H. Robertson. 

..Virginia.. 
State Fertilizer Co., 

Maiiul'.icturersof 
HIGH GRADE FERTILIZERS 

FOR ALL CROPS. 

FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA. 



Richardson & Davidson 



DEALt RS IN 



STAPLE AND FANCY 



GROCERIES 



Provisions, <8> Mill Feed, Corn, 

Oats, and Field Seed of all kinds. 

FARMVILLE, .^^^^^ VIRGINIA. 

C. E. CHAPPELL, 



.DEALER IN. .. 



CONFECTIONERIES, FRUITS, 



BLANK BOOKS, STATIONERY, 
TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 

^MILLINERY,., 




MAIN STREET, FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA 



E. C. WILTSE, 

(Successor to K. Wii.tse) 
Dealer in... 

IFATCHES 
JEWELRY. 



School, Class and Fraternity Pins 

MADE TO ORDER. 

FARMVILLE, VA. 

m FARMVILLE 

telephone 

companyhe; 

W. E. ANDERSON, M. D., PRESIDENT. 

S. P. VANDERSLICE, SEC. AND TREAS. 

::;•::: DIRECTORS ::::::: 

Dr. W. E. ANDERSON, S. P. VANDERSLICE, 

W. P. VENABLE, :::::: .JOHN R. MARTIN 

AND E. LEE MORRIS. 

RATES 

FOR PLACES OF BUSINESS, Sl-T PER YEAR. 
FOR RESIDENCES, $10 PER YEAR. 



GO TO^^^e 



...HUNT... 



THE... 
\ RTIS' 



. . . Photographer^ 



For Up-to-Date Work in his line. 
College Work a Specialty. 



AWARDED TIIIIEK HANDSOME MEDALS 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN PHOTOGRAPHY 

AT STATE CONVENTIONS. 



FARMVILLE, VA. 



Cf harlottesviUe 

Woolen Mills, 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA., 



JiANUFACTUUERS 



Hi^h G)'ade Cadet Grays ^ 
Ifidigo Blucs^ &fc. 



CADET GRAYS a specially. 



THE ANDERSON DRUG CO, 



Qan supply you with anything a first-class Drug Store 
ought to have. ##"%## Quality of goods first-class. 



A REGISTERED DRUGGIST 

ALWAYS IN CHARGE. 



FARMVILLE, VA 



Farmville 

Manufacturing 

...Company 


Virginia... 


G. M. Robeson, 
Proprietor. 

FARMVILLE, VA. 

Manufac-turer ok .\nd 
Dealer in 

...Builders' Material... 

Pine and Hardwood Inside Finish, Sash, Doors, 

Blinds, Stair Work, Flooring, Ceiling 

and Dressed Lumber, Laths, 

Frames, Mouldings, 

and Brackets. 

Rcadv-niixcd Paints. Plow Bandies. 

SEND FOR PRICES. 


High School. 

/. Course preparatory to College. 

11. Regular High School Course. 

HI. Commercial Course (including 
Shorthand, Typewriting and 
Bookkeeping) . 

Address, 

N. C. STARKE, Prin., 

Farmville, Va. 



ESTABLISHED 18 



INCORPORATED 1889. 



THE FARMVILLE MILLS 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



LEADING BRANDS: 

Pride OF Farmville and 
High Bridge Family. 



...High Grade Flours... 



Pure Water Ground 
Meal and Mill Feed. 



FARMVILLE, #<?: 



VIRGINIA. 




Ct1ICA(iO 

176- 164 Monroe §t 

NEW YORK 1123 Sroadway 



We mflkp low pnces on (Ploss Apoouncemenrs 

Invilotions.rroyrommes and fllloHJerenJrai/ed 
mi dip ^ramped Mationery 




WE DID /V07" PUBLISH THIS ONE BUI WILL DO SO /V/^rT" K«>M> 



A New Era in the 

Educational Development of the Country. 

The Johnson Readers, Lee's Histories. Manly's Literature, Curry's South, and numerous other 
excellent text-books recently issued by the B. F. JOHNSON PUBLISHING COMPANY, are 
marking a ne'w era in the educational development of the country. All who are interested in the 
latest and best text-books should ■write us for catalogue and full particulars. 

FREE 
The Revival of Interest in Southern Letters---Llterature In the South, 

By CIIAKLKS \V. KkNT ;IUil IIAJIII.TON W, Mabie, 

NEW BOOKS FOR THE GENERAL READER. 
"Uncle Isaac ; or Old Pays in the South," by Dr. William Dudley Powers, ----- .si. ,50 

Poems op James Barron Hope, - - ].25 

"Bobbie," ----- --_--....--.-._- .75 

"Heart Songs," poems by Mrs. Josie Frazee Cappleman of Mississippi, -------- 1.10 

"Now THAT You ARE Married," _..__- .50 

Address, B. F. JOHNSON PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

901-903-905 East Main Street, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



LOOK! MOST STARTLING NOTICE 11 


J.M.CruteCo. 


• 
GO TO 


MRS. H. H. HUNT'S 


...IIFAI.EKS IN... 


For the Best, 

Cheapest and Most Stylish 

MILLINERY in 


STOVES, CROCKERY, 
TINWARE, &c., 


FARMVILLE, VA. 


FARMVILLE, ^ ^ ^ jt VIRGINIA. 



"It Pays to buy at BALDWIN' Sr 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, CLOTHING for Men and Boys, LADIES' AND GENTS' FUR- 
NISHING GOODS, STATIONERY and FANCY GOODS, TRUNKS and BAGS. Up-to-Date 
SHOES for all. The very Lowest Prices, cr^ -^ v"* r. a. BALDWIN, Farmville, Va 



1855 ^ CATALOGU E No. 14. j* 1900 
Write... 

P. D. JOHNSON 
JEWELRY COMPANY 

No. 1 MAIDEN r,ANE, 
NEW YORK. 

For New Catalogue No. 14 of Watches, Dia- 
monds, Jewelry, Solid Silver and Plated Ware. 
Spectacles fitted by mail. 



\V. T. DOYNE, 



.DEALER IN., 



Pumiture, Wall Paper, 

Mattresses, Window Shades, 

Pianos, Organs, Etc. 

UNDEdTSKlNG A SPECIALTY 



FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA. 



Something New in Photography 

Send your Photograph and get 12 copied for 25 cents. Returned with picture you send in one 
week. Send for sample free. Photographs of all Presidents of the United States, 10 cents. 

F. J. WALSH, 120 PERRY STREET, TRENTON, N J. 



J. B. WALL, 



,.DE.\LER IX. 



DRY ^ GOODS, S NOTIONS, ^ BOOTS, 
SHOES, ^ CLOTHING, ^ HATS, ^ &c. 



FARMVILLE, VA. 



CHAS.BUGG &f SON 
Fancy Gi-occries^ 



iNCLfDINi; A FULL LINE OK... 

Cakes and Crackers, 
Heinz' s Pickles and Olives, 

FARMVILLE, VA. 



PLANTERS BANK 



FARMVILLE, VA. 



Capital and Surplus, - - $7S,ooo. 

Directors : H. E. Barrow, H. A. Stokes, .1. M. Crute, 
E. M. Burton, C. M. Walker, T. J. Davis. 

Does a general banking business. Interest 
allowed on time deposits. Loans negotiated. 
Checks sold on all principal cities and Collections 
made. 



Paulettt Son & Co. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

And dealers in 

Farmers' Supplies of all kinds. 

Agents for Farmville for 
PILLSBURY'S FLOUR. 

Farmville, Virginia. 



THE FARMVILLE HERALD 

Has what few of the small town newspapers have. The people u^ant it for its complete local ne'ws ; 
the business public for its excellence as an advertising medium— the best in Southside Virginia. 
Subscription price, ONE DOLLAR per annum. .^^ Address The Farmville Herald, Farmville, Va. 



N. B. Davidson 

Wholesale and 
Retail 

GROCER, 

And Dealer in 

STAPLE DRY GOODS, BOOTS 
AND SHOES, 

Farmville, Virginia. 



II. K. KAIilll 



BARROW COAL CO, 

Dealers in 

SPLINT, POCAHONTAS, 

VIRGINIA CITY 

AND ANTHRACITE COALS, 



FARMVfLLE, VIRGINIA. 



DUVALL, ROBERTSON & CO., 

Commission Merchants and Dealers in Hardware, 



FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA. 



L. J. VERSER, 

deaIjF.k in 

Dry Goods, Fancy Dress Goods, 



NOTIONS OF EVER 



BOOTS AND SHOES, HATS 
AND CAPS. 



Ladies' and Misses' Shoes made to order. 
FARMVILLE, VA. 



H, E. BARROW, 

— di^atjEu in 

FRESH MEATS & ICE, 

BEEF, MUTTON, 

LAMB, PORK, 

SHOAT AND SAUSAGE, 

FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA 



The fFiNSTON Drug Co. 



The Corner D/ii</ Store 



FARMVILLE, - VIRGINIA 



.1. Jl. IIAJILKT. 



i:. K. HA.MLET. 



Hamlet h Hamlet 



DENTISTS, 



'""pamplIn. ^^^•1"' Office, Main St., Farmville, Va, 



PIANOS 
ORGANS 

SHEEr MUSIC 

And everything in the musical line 

at LOWEST PRICES. 

We sell for the Manufacturers. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUES AND TERMS 

IF. B. CRIDLIN, 

Box 298. Fcirmvillc, Va. 


Do You 

Need Money? 

TO PAY OFF OLD DEBTS, 
OR BUY NEW PROPERTY? 

Then write to the undersigned 
for cheap rates and liberal terms. 

FARMVILLE BUILDING 
AND TRUST CO, 

FARMVILLE, VA 



WW 



CLUB, COLLEGE AND CLASS PINS and RINOS. 




^ ^ "^ '?f? w w w w w w w w 



'^WWWWWWW^ 






WW 



J. p. BELL COMPANY, 



914 E. Main St 



....LYNCHBURG, VA. 

Publishers, Printers and Stationers. 

COLLEGE AND SCHOOL PRINTING ...loc Printed tMs Hnnual. 



"• Wc V W^^ >'-^ v^ 










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5-to13.^J-'- *;«(.■!»'■ V r'T^Kt. .